Zelig

1983

Action / Comedy

19
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 100%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 88%
IMDb Rating 7.8 10 35770

Synopsis


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July 17, 2016 at 09:41 PM

Director

Cast

Woody Allen as Leonard Zelig
Charles Chaplin as Himself
Michael Jeter as Freshman #2
Mia Farrow as Dr. Eudora Nesbitt Fletcher
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
568.83 MB
1280*694
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 19 min
P/S 2 / 9
1.19 GB
1920*1040
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 19 min
P/S 0 / 14

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Asm Nabil 9 / 10

The meaning of life

I'm 12 years old I run into a synagogue I ask the rabbi the meaning of life He tells me the meaning of life But he tells it to me in Hebrew I don't understand Hebrew Then he wants to charge me $600 for Hebrew lessons. 95/100

Reviewed by HotToastyRag 5 / 10

A little quirky

Zelig is a pretty strange movie. While parts of it are clever, I think only die-hard Woody Allen fans are going to like this one. It's filmed as a mockumentary, which in itself is a very tricky genre to master.

Woody Allen plays the title character, and Mia Farrow, his at-the-time sweetie pie, plays his psychiatrist. Woody has become a celebrity because he acts as a human chameleon and mimics anyone he comes in contact with. Sometimes the film uses stock footage of real historical figures, like Lou Gehrig, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Babe Ruth, Charles Lindbergh, Charlie Chaplin, and others. Mia interviews and observes Woody, trying to understand his condition through various methods. Parts of it are cute, parts of it are funny, but parts of it get a little long in the tooth. If you love Woody and want to watch all thirteen of the movies he made with Mia, go ahead and rent Zelig. As long as you expect it to be quirky, you'll know what you're in for.

Reviewed by oOoBarracuda 6 / 10

Zelig

Woody Allen's 1983 film, Zelig was an interesting concept for a film. In the style of a mockumentary, Woody Allen starred as a man who was a literal human chameleon, appearing in the background newsreel footage through many different periods of history as he assumed the role of the context he was in. Zelig was able to change anything about himself, including his ethnicity with almost no effort. Eventually, under the care of a world-renowned psychologist, it was discovered that Zelig suffered from an insatiable need for ultimate conformity with the goal of being universally liked. The rest of the mockumentary delved into the psychological and legal struggles of a man who could change so much about himself so effortlessly.

Perhaps, Zelig suffered from my not being in the right frame of mind to take it in, or perhaps it was just so different from what I expected at that moment, or perhaps it is simply a film that begs a second viewing but I didn't love it as much as I loved many other films I've been watching throughout this Woody Allen project. Zelig uses the mockumentary style in the best way that I have ever seen, those types of films don't impact me, personally, but I can recognize that Zelig used this format well. Zelig is complete with a traditionally perfect Woody Allen opening, and plenty of trademarks of the director to make any Woody Allen fan happy. Zelig grapples with death and identity, in perhaps the deepest way I've seen yet. The film is also another in his oeuvre that uses gorgeous black and white photography. What was missed, however, was the incredible dialogue I've come to expect from Woody Allen films, which was a bit of a letdown.

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