We Are What We Are

2013

Action / Drama / Horror / Thriller

217
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 85%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 48%
IMDb Rating 5.9 10 17449

Synopsis


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 124,468 times
October 19, 2013 at 03:46 PM

Director

Cast

Odeya Rush as Alyce Parker
Kelly McGillis as Marge
Wyatt Russell as Deputy Anders
Ambyr Childers as Iris Parker
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
806.86 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 45 min
P/S 0 / 16
1.64 GB
1920*1080
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 45 min
P/S 1 / 4

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Kittycat63 8 / 10

An Engrossing, Slow Building Chiller ... Shame About The Ending!

I watched this the other day, on Amazon Prime, with totally 'fresh' eyes - i.e. I'd never heard of it (or the original Spanish version) before and I didn't know who most of the actors were (except for Kelly McGillis). I was torn between watching this and, ironically, another film with Kelly McGillis in (The Innkeepers), but I didn't even know initially that she was in this movie too so when I first saw her in it I found it very coincidental!

Anyway, I'm very glad I watched this movie. Anyone expecting a nonstop, moronic gorefest though should look elsewhere. That's NOT what I was looking for and was looking to watch something a bit more challenging, interesting and less 'lowest common denominator'.

We Are What We are is a slow burner of a movie but from the get go I found it captivating, mainly thanks to the 'moody' setting, the rainy ambiance, the dark colours, etc. It's a beautifully shot movie and the actors were all very good, and I especially liked the performance of the doctor whose daughter went missing and who gradually puts two and two together to realize what became of her. The actor who played the father was also great. There are some gory moments in the movie but few enough that even fairly squeamish people should be able to watch the movie without feeling the need to flee! Having said that, my sister - who HATES scary and horror movies - would probably refuse to watch it!

As the movie progressed the beginning made more sense - i.e. why the mother died the way she did and why she did what she did after leaving the store (re the flyer!).

The only thing about this movie that disappointed me was the bizarre, schizophrenic, unexplained ending. It was way too far fetched and the total turnaround of the younger daughter (not so much the older daughter who is a lot more 'knowing' and calculated) from how she was shown throughout the rest of the movie was totally illogical. It just made no sense, unless she was supposed to be even more 'addled' than the older sister.

Overall I really enjoyed this movie and am glad I happened to come across it quite randomly. I can definitely recommend.

P.S. Some of the reviews for We Are What We are are SOOOOO detailed they're really not fair. To pretty much give away what an entire movie is about is so wrong - people need to review movies clearly and fairly without resorting to giving everything away. Personally, I think IMDb should refuse to publish such spoiler laden reviews.

Reviewed by rdoyle29 8 / 10

An appealing slow burn

The matriarch of the Parker family dies suddenly right before an important family ritual. It falls on eldest daughter Iris (Ambyr Childers) to take her mother's place and complete the ritual. Heavy rains and flooding have revealed evidence that leads to Doc Barrow (Michael Parks) investigating the Parkers and their connection to a host of missing people. This one's a really slow meditation on religion and familial authority that has an explosively gory climax. Kelly McGillis and Larry Fessenden turn up in supporting roles.

Reviewed by BA_Harrison 5 / 10

What is 'We Are What We Are'?

What 'We Are What We Are' is is oh-so-slow and way too long. I'm not averse to the slow-burn approach per se, but when it holds as few surprises for the viewer as this film from 'Stake Land' director Jim Mickle, you can colour me not impressed.

The plot revolves around the Parker family, who harbour a dark secret that has blighted their ancestors for centuries. You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to figure out what that secret is early on, or how the action will unfold, which makes the film kinda pointless.

Mickle isn't without some skill behind the camera, his narrative flowing well, the imagery clearly carefully considered (albeit way too washed out for my liking), and the cast all put in solid performances—it's just a shame that the film as a whole is what it is: predictable and ultimately rather forgettable.

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