True Story


Action / Crime / Drama / Mystery / Thriller

Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 44%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 44%
IMDb Rating 6.3 10 45857


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 599,913 times
July 23, 2015 at 05:29 PM



James Franco as Christian Longo
Felicity Jones as Jill Barker
Jonah Hill as Michael Finkel
Ethan Suplee as Pat Frato
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
755.97 MB
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 7 / 88
1.44 GB
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 9 / 61

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by jpenha-75970 9 / 10

The movie hooked me as much as Longo hooked Finkel

I just bumped into this film on HBO. I had never heard of it or read reviews, but the premise and the actors led me to stick around for a few minutes . . . and then for the whole duration. I found the film absorbing and gripping. Franco, especially in those close-ups in the prison interview room, mesmerizes just as Longo must have done in reality. If we never find out all the whys we'd love to understand, that's because this is a true story, and life just doesn't answer all the questions that screenwriters of fiction can pen.

Reviewed by tomgillespie2002 5 / 10

Fails to convince as a character piece, but sizzles with tension as a work of true crime

Based on the memoir of the same name by shamed ex-journalist Michael Finkel, Rupert Goold's True Story is a story of amazing coincidence and unexpected friendship, as two unrelated men from completely different backgrounds find their destinies intertwined. At its heart, this is a true-crime drama that flew under many people's radars, which is surprising given how audience interest in shocking tales of murder and the subsequent trials have been piqued by Netflix's many terrific documentaries. Yet the crime itself, which occurs before the film begins, isn't the main focus of True Story. Instead, we get a character piece centred on a busted writer who believes he has been given a second chance, and a man awaiting trial for the murder of his wife and three children.

The film begins with Finkel (played by Jonah Hill) in Africa, interviewing various victims of modern-day slavery. He is seen as a future Pulitzer recipient by his bosses at the New York Times, and has seen many of his previous pieces grace the front page. He is soon brought back down to Earth when his editors confront him about creating a composite character for his latest story, and is soon fired. Other papers want nothing to do with him, so when he learns that a man wanted for murder named Christian Longo (James Franco) has been using his name before finally being arrested, he sees it as his opportunity to drag his name out of the mud. A fan of Finkel's work, Longo grants him exclusive rights to the story, and in return Finkel will teach him out to write, and promise not to publish anything until after the trial. The two become friends, with Finkel going so far as believing they are some kind of kindred spirits.

A lot of time is spent with the two characters simply talking in a room, and it's a nice surprise that theatre director Goold manages to avoid a stagey feel. But what goes down within the prison's visiting room fails to convince as one would expect from such seasoned actors. Franco puts his half-closed eyes and charming smile to good use, but you rarely get the sense that Hill is a writer capable of reaching the dizzy heights of wunderkind status at the New York Times, and he always feels two or three steps behind. As Finkel's wife, Felicity Jones is given little to do at first but gaze at her husband with concern as he pours over documents and Longo's extensive letters, before she locks horns with the slippery inmate himself. Yet these later dramatic scenes seem inserted to add unnecessary emotional drive, or to give the talented actress something to do. Nevertheless, this is an engaging retelling of a fascinating true story which sizzles with tension until the very end. Unless you already know the outcome of course.

Reviewed by blanche-2 6 / 10

Psychological study

"True Story" from 2015 stars Jonah Hill and James Franco as writer Mike Finkel and killer Christian Longo, respectively.

Finkel was a well-regarded journalist for the New York Times who fudged a story and combined five people into one, was caught, and was fired.

He learns later that a man who murdered his wife and three children, Christian Longo, was caught in Mexico and was at the time using the name Mike Finkel. Intrigued, Finkel arranges a meeting.

What follows is a bonding experience, where Longo claims to be a long-time fan of Finkel, and Finkel finds similarities between his own life and is impressed that he and Finkel even take similar types of notes. Longo asks that none of the information he gives Finkel be released until after the trial and promises him exclusivity. In exchange, Longo would like to learn to write the way that Finkel can and asks for pointers.

Finkel begins to believe that Longo is covering someone and doubts his guilt. He also realizes that the story is more than article -

it's a book.

It's not until the trial that Finkel learns the true story.

Good film about an actual case, but while it's effective, it doesn't have the bone-chilling quality it could have. The acting is good, particularly by Franco who has the showier role. The acting is done in a naturalistic style - a tiny bit more punch in a film like this might have helped as it lacks some necessary emotion.

I think a stronger script or even more potent direction could have made this a truly devastating experience. As it is, it's interesting without being fascinating.

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