Trading Places

1983

Action / Comedy

89
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 88%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 85%
IMDb Rating 7.5 10 115005

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Jamie Lee Curtis as Ophelia
Eddie Murphy as Billy Ray Valentine
Giancarlo Esposito as Cellmate #2
Dan Aykroyd as Louis Winthorpe III
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
816.57 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 56 min
P/S 5 / 29
1.84 GB
1920*1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 56 min
P/S 2 / 30

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Ian 7 / 10

Twisted Social Experiment

(Flash Review)

This is a great classic comedy with Murphy and Aykroyd heading into their prime. Murphy is a street hustler and Aykroyd is a successful business man at a brokerage. Their paths cross in an unlikely way and then later again as part of a cruel scheme concocted by two bored and egocentric wealthy brokers to see if that can take a random low-life and turn them into a smart business person. The title gives it away that their statuses in life will somehow be switched and it is really amusing to see Murphy transition into a semi-sophisticated man while Aykroyd the reverse with the added spite and frantic confusion that tests his limits of sanity. Will Murphy become a success and will Aykroyd lose his station in life or be able to recover? What will the two men learn from their experiment? Overall, this is filled with many funny situations and gags and is melded together with a proper and engaging story. An 80s must see.

Reviewed by Sam Panico 10 / 10

My idea for a Christmas movie!

In Italy, Trading Places is shown on TV every Christmas Eve, becoming a classic everyone can love. Here, it's not remembered as a holiday film. Yet it is - a parable about how much money really matters within a week or so of time within the lives of two very different men.

Louis Winthorpe III (Dan Ackroyd) has the benefits of a great upbringing and Ivy League education. Billy Ray Valentine (Eddie Murphy) is street smart from the wrong side of the tracks.

The Duke brothers, Randolph and Mortimer (Ralph Bellamy and Don Ameche), come from old money and have been on the stock exchange since it opened. They debate nature versus nurture and decide to switch the social roles of our two protagonists and bet on the results.

In less time than you'd expect, Valentine has easily accepted the upper crust lifestyle while showing class and manners that Louis lacked. And the richer of our heroes descends into petty theft and alcoholism - again all in the span of several hours. He also discovers what love is all about from Jamie Lee Curtis' character Ophelia. And Denholm Elliot's character, Coleman, goes from butler to accomplice to friend.

Along the way, the film has plenty of great character roles, too. Paul Gleason continues his career-long mastery of playing complete dicks. Jim Belushi shoes up at a party, Jamie Lee's sister Kelly (who is also is Michele Soavi's The Sect) shows up, as does Frank Oz, Bo Diddley and Al Franken, years before he'd go into politics and take inappropriate photos.

The leads work so well together that you wish they'd made several films together. It's a natural, breezy film, one that continues to deliver on its basic premise. This movie is a success on every level, with Roger Ebert favorably comparing it to comedies of Frank Capra and Preston Sturges. The only misstep it takes is in the backward 1980's usage of homophobic slurs - they really take you out of the film.

Ralph Bellamy and Don Ameche are my favorite part of the film. Ameche had not made a movie in 13 years before this film! Their characters would return in 1988's Coming to America when Prince Akeem gives them money to get off the streets.

While we may not celebrate this film as a holiday favorite in the U.S., I'd advise you buck the trend. John Landis really created something special here and it's packed with subtle allusions to his past films as well as tiny easter eggs that appear in all of his films, like the ape that calls back to past Landis films Schlock and The Kentucky Fried Movie, Louis having the same prison number as Jake Blues from The Blues Brothers, and Murphy breaking the fourth wall. It does so well what many movies of this era do: set up a basic premise and then let hijinks ensue.

Reviewed by greystock_home 10 / 10

All time classic

This is an all time classic and genuinely funny film all the way through. Brilliant script, acting and direction. I can't fault it in any way.

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