They Call Me Mister Tibbs!

1970

Action / Crime / Drama / Mystery

14
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 60%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 37%
IMDb Rating 6.1 10 2559

Synopsis


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May 26, 2015 at 03:19 AM

Director

Cast

Edward Asner as Woody Garfield
Sidney Poitier as Virgil Tibbs
Martin Landau as Logan Sharpe
Anthony Zerbe as Rice Weedon
720p.BLU
812.38 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 48 min
P/S 6 / 5

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by seymourblack-1 7 / 10

The Stakes Are Lower This Time Around

As a sequel to the multi-Oscar-winning "In The Heat Of The Night" (1967), this movie must've surprised its audience because it's so different to its predecessor. The intense drama of the first movie was fuelled by the hostility, racism and threats to his life, that homicide detective Virgil Tibbs (Sidney Poitier) had to endure as he worked on a murder investigation in a small town in Mississippi where the bigoted local police chief did everything that he could to make life difficult for him. By contrast, the type of conflicts that Tibbs deals with in the sequel are those of a cop who doesn't want to believe evidence that points to the guilt of one of his close friends and the domestic problems that arise as a result of the conflicting demands of his work and family commitments. Inevitably the stakes seem lower because Tibbs' problems aren't life-threatening and the intensity of the drama is reduced accordingly. Other differences that would've surprised fans of the first movie, are that the unmarried Philadelphia cop now works in San Francisco and is married with two children (the oldest being 11-years-old).

"They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!" is actually a very straightforward murder mystery which could have featured any fictional detective, not least because there are no racial issues involved. The main things that actually link the two films are the title of the sequel, which is taken from a memorable remark that Tibbs made in the original and the unusual technique of using close-ups of the characters looking directly into the camera. In the first movie this happened only once when Tibbs was looking at a significant piece of evidence that he'd removed from a car whilst in the sequel, it's used extensively.

In the affluent Nob Hill district of San Francisco, the dead body of a prostitute is found in her apartment by the building's janitor who then goes to another apartment in the same building and informs the landlord, Rice Weedon (Anthony Zerbe). When Weedon phones the police to report the suspected murder, he mentions that the last person seen leaving the victim's apartment was Reverend Logan Sharpe (Martin Landau). Detective Lieutenant Virgil Tibbs of the SFPD homicide department is assigned to the case and finds a statuette close to the body which appears to have been used in the attack on Joy Sturges (Linda Towne).

In the investigation that follows, Tibbs speaks to the janitor, Mealie Williamson (Juano Hernandez) whose fingerprints are the only ones found on the statuette, Weedon, who it transpires is a drug dealer / pimp and an associate of his called Woody Garfield (Edward Asner) who holds the lease on the victim's apartment. Tibbs, who's a close friend of local political activist Logan Sharpe, also questions him in a manner that's very circumspect to avoid being given any information which, as a friend, he might be expected to keep to himself. The pressures that Tibbs experiences due to the nature of his investigation are then made greater as his wife blames him and the long hours he works, for the domestic problems that she has to cope with on a daily basis.

The ways in which Tibbs tries to be meticulously professional in completing his investigation as well as trying to protect his family life makes his character interesting and Sidney Poitier does well in portraying the psychological strains that Tibbs is under. Martin Landau is also good as Tibbs' friend who's passionate about his religious and political beliefs and heavily committed to his community work.

Everything about "They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!" is predictably more modest than its highly-regarded predecessor but is nevertheless, still a diverting crime drama that features some good performances.

Reviewed by ma-cortes 5 / 10

This is the second of Virgil Tibbs series based on the role originated in the successful ¨In the heat of the night¨

Weak sequel to immensely popular ¨In the heat of the night¨ finds San Francisco Police Lieutenant Virgil Tibbs (Sidney Poitier) called in to investigate when a liberal street preacher (Martin Landau) is suspicious the murder a prostitute . This implicated preacher results to be Virgil's good friend . As Inspector Virgil is again investigating a killing and attempting to clear his friend , as well . The African-American detective now married (to Barbara McNair) with family pursues baddies and tries to bust a major dope-smuggling operation .

An inferior follow-up that has action , suspense , drama , thrills , violence and intriguing finale . This packs the further adventures of the role Tibbs/Sidney Poitier created for the film ¨In the heat of the night¨ . The picture turns out to be slow , boring and it has dated one bit . The movie is realized in Television style , though contains some exciting chase sequences , pursuits and surprising ending . Here Sidney Poitier reprises his ordinary character , giving nice acting . Remaining cast is frankly well such as : Anthony Zerbe , Beverly Todd , Juano Hernandez , Jeff Corey , Norma Crane , David Sheiner , Edward Asner who wears a full toupee for his part and special mention for Martin Landau . Atmospheric cinematography and excellent music score by Quincy Jones in his usual style .

The trilogy starts with the excellent ¨In the heat of the night¨ (1967) that won 5 Oscars , in which Tibbs joins forces with redneck sheriff who grudgingly accepts helps in resolve a bizarre killing , being directed by Norman Jewison , it stars Rod Steiger , Warren Oates , Lee Grant , Anthony James . The second installment is this ¨They called me Mister Tibbs¨ (1970) . And the third and final appearance , ¨The organization¨(1971) , by Don Medford with Barbara McNair , Shree North , Raul Julia , Ron O'Neal , Allan Garfield and Daniel J Travanti , in which Tibbs/Sidney Poitier is out to break up a ring of dope smugglers .

The motion picture was middlingly directed by Gordon Douglas . This is one of various and professional works of his long career as filmmaker . He was a Hollywood veteran director, directing early movies such as ¨Little rascals¨, ¨Spanky¨. He was an expert on adventures genre as ¨Black arrow¨ and ¨Fortunes of Captain Blood¨ , both starred by Louis Hayward ; but he's mainly specialist filmmaking Western , his first was ¨ Girl rush (1944)¨ and in the 40s directed ¨Doolins of Oklahoma¨ and ¨The Nevadan¨ for duo Harry Joe Brown-Randolph Scott , as well as Wartime genre as ¨Up periscope¨. He went on directing Alan Ladd's vehicles as ¨Iron Mistress¨ and ¨The fiend who walked west¨ which resulted to be a Western rendition to ¨Kiss of death¨. In the 50s he proved his specialty on Western in the films starred by Clint Walker as ¨Fort Dobbs¨ ,¨Yellowstone Kelly¨, ¨Gold of seven Saints¨ and about legendary bandits as ¨Doolins of Oklahoma¨ and ¨Great Missouri raid¨ . After that , he filmed ¨Chuka¨ (1967) that bears remarkable resemblance to ¨Only the valiant¨ , the remake ¨Stagecoach (1966)¨ , and the superior ¨Rio Conchos¨. Douglas usually worked for Frank Sinatra in various films such as ¨Lady in Cement¨, ¨Tony Rome¨, ¨The detective¨ , ¨Robin and the 7 Hoods¨. Rating : 5,5 Passable and acceptable . The flick will appeal to Sidney Poitier fans .

Reviewed by funkyfry 3 / 10

They call me Mr. Sequel!

Even allowing for the inevitable "sequel letdown", this film is more than just a little mediocre. I doubt Poitier would have done it if he hadn't been offered a lot of money. Basically, everything that made the first film work is either missing or wrong. For example: Rod Steiger's racist cop and all the narrative friction that came with him -- gone. Quincy Jones' excellent music -- here, as stylish as ever but done in a funky style that's incongruous with the character of Virgil Tibbs and which makes the film seem more generic in a "70s blaxploitation" way than it should. The only major element still present in force is Poitier, and his performance is good. He's added a more sexual element to his performance, and finds some humor as well in the mostly dry situations. It's just not enough to power such a mediocre film.

The mystery elements do not work very well. We know from the beginning that the murderer is either the really obvious guy, a landlord (Anthony Zerbe) who looks like date rape on two legs, or the slightly less obvious guy, a preacher (Martin Landau) who's an old friend of Tibbs. Landau's character is so poorly conceived that it's amazing Landau is able to do anything at all with it. BTW, with his largely black congregation and his political crusades, Landau's character more than a little resembles the infamous Oakland/San Francisco preacher Jim Jones, who would rocket to stardom a decade or so later in supremely unfortunate circumstances.

To make up for the lack of "heart" (the first Tibbs movie was a buddy cop story), this film gives him a family. He's also been moved inexplicably from Philadelphia to San Francisco, but presumably the audience wasn't supposed to remember anything from the first film, right? Anyway, his home life is so dull, and so objectionable on so many levels -- after having an awkward conversation with his son about how he was "supposed to be there, the black man and all that", he hits him in the face -- that it makes a film that otherwise might have been mediocre into a disaster. Barbara McNair, whose main experience prior to this was playing a nun in an Elvis movie, must have been thrilled to share so many scenes with Poitier but she can't strike a rapport with him that makes up for the fact that we already saw an entire Virgil Tibbs movie without her. She's window dressing of the most painful sort, and the writers' attempts to make Tibbs' family life some kind of social statement is just about as successful as their attempt to make Landau's preacher into some kind of activist hero.

In fact, that's the film in a nutshell -- the first movie was timeless, this one tries instead to be topical.

It wouldn't be fair to close these comments without a few words about the director, Gordon Douglas: he sucks. Right from the very first shots of the movie you can tell it's a disaster: he shoots the entire murder in first person subjective camera angle, which is just as tacky and dated as extreme zooms from the same era. The fact that the producers picked a guy like Douglas, who'd been in Hollywood already for almost forty years and had directed almost 90 mediocre films, says a lot about their lack of ambition for this picture. Which is really too bad, because the original film combined genre mystery elements with social problems in a stylish way, whereas this film just plods along like any other B movie.

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