The Swimmer

1968

Action / Drama

48
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 100%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 83%
IMDb Rating 7.7 10 7445

Synopsis


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 22,800 times
March 27, 2014 at 02:53 AM

Director

Cast

Burt Lancaster as Ned Merrill
Kim Hunter as Betty Graham
Diana Muldaur as Cynthia
Joan Rivers as Joan
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
751.40 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 35 min
P/S 2 / 7
1.43 GB
1920*1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 35 min
P/S 2 / 4

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by mark.waltz 6 / 10

Burt Lancaster and his tight shorts are the whole show.

Swimming with the sharks of society is a hobby for the former Jim Thorpe, all American, jumping hurdles again and running from estate to estate for a quick lap and chat with the owners. It seems that he knows all of these society people, some seemingly nice, others outwardly hostile, and a few of the women obviously in lust with his tight body. He's sort of an angel to some and a devil to others, and in each of these encounters a little something is learned. Lancaster is in every single scene, surrounded by a cast of very familiar faces who pop in and out quickly yet leave a mark on this journey. The film starts off on a friendly note but things get tense quickly. Some of the wealthy businessmen types try to get him involved in business deals or offer him a job. The women, who range in age from early 20's to late 50's, ogle him. It's apparent that everybody wants a piece of him, whether to possess him or chew him up and spit him out.

Among the famous faces are Kim Hunter, Marge Champion, Diana Muldaur, Cornelia Otis Skinner (making accusations towards him that you can only guess what transpired) and Dolph Sweet. He flirts with a young Joan Rivers, playing an insecure woman who basks in his attention and nearly falls under his spell. Guests at a party stand by as the hostess anayalates him. Later Muldaur begs him to leave her alone as her facade of hate crumbles to show the things line where hate ends and love begins. It's a journey for this spirit whom Lancaster plays to realize the impact he's made on everyone of these people, one which has destroyed some of them and one which threatens to destroy him. It's a hard film to understand if you are not in the right frame of mind, and one which could use repeat viewings to pick up things you may have missed, that is if you dare to put yourself through it a second time.

Reviewed by rzajac 9 / 10

Worth bashing your head against

("Loses" a star for being, in some ways, a little dated, in terms purely of production).

It's a lucid dream/nightmare, it's a metaphor, it's a reckoning, it's an enigma.

It's all these things. It's also a nice reminder that the willingness to craft a nut perhaps too tough to crack wasn't beyond a Hollywood system famously too eager to put butts in the seats.

In some ways, this is a dangerous film--it teeters on the edge of being an apologetic for the unforgivable.

But... it also plies a plausible deniability... as its images ultimately seem thrown over the wall from the subconscious. Or... is it the Jungian collective unconscious? If the latter, then... it's your baby. Deal with it.

You owe it to yourself to let it screen in your conscious mind. For your delectation (at least).

Check it out.

Reviewed by rdoyle29 6 / 10

A frustrating flick with a great Lancaster performance

Burt Lancaster stars as a resident of an upper class California suburb who realizes that he can essentially swim home from a friends house by hopping from backyard pool to backyard pool. So he does. Along the way, his encounters with the residents of the homes point to hidden secrets and general suburban malaise. I like Lancaster in this film, but I can't say I like the film very much. Perry fills it with a lot of visual touches that were very typical of middle-brow, late-60's art cinema, and it really buries the film under a load of extraneous nonsense. All that aside, a lot of the plausibility of the film's plot rests on people not saying exactly what they're thinking even when they have no reason to not just ask Lancaster what the hell is wrong with him. The film points and gestures at a final twist that's just so blatantly obvious by the time it arrives that the characters's refusal to just come out and say it is frustrating.

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