The Meaning of Life

1983

Action / Comedy / Fantasy / Musical

135
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 90%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 83%
IMDb Rating 7.6 10 98155

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Michael Caine as Wounded British Soldier
Terry Gilliam as Window Washer / Fish #4 / Walters / Middle of the Film Announcer / M'Lady Joeline / Mr. Brown / Howard Katzenberg
Matt Frewer as Cornered Executive who Jumps
John Cleese as Fish #2 / Dr. Spencer / Humphrey Williams / Sturridge / Ainsworth / Waiter / Eric's Assistant / MaƮtre D' / Grim Reaper
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
807.48 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 47 min
P/S 0 / 19
1.64 GB
1920*1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 47 min
P/S 5 / 26

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Eric Stevenson 10 / 10

Quite perfect

This is one of the best comedies I have ever seen. It's probably in my Top 10, if not Top 5. While I (and most other people) consider "Monty Python And The Holy Grail" to be the best Monty Python movie, this is still amazing. What's interesting is that since it's an anthology movie, I've actually seen bits and pieces of it over the years. I already saw about 38 minutes of it before. It's of course worth it to see the whole thing.

It seems as though everything is unrelated, but it really does make a lot more sense at the end. We even get a nice happy ending with everything resolved and guess what? They actually tell you the meaning of life at the end! Well, at least what they think it is. It really isn't a mean spirited movie or anything. I don't, however, recall the original Monty Python show being this graphic or obscene.

You can just get away with a lot more in movies. I think my favorite segment would probably be the bit with Mr. Caruso. Yes, it's disgusting, but it's hilarious. I also love the lengthy opening bit as that honestly probably works better as action than comedy. It's extremely unpredictable, yet it does form somewhat of a coherent narrative. Among all of their films, this is the one that seemed the most like their show. ****

Reviewed by Robert McElwaine 8 / 10

The teams last hurrah is more polished but suffers from being slightly more unfocused

Taking their final bow as a team with this being their final collaborative film project, Monty Python's The Meaning of Life finally hit cinema theaters back in 1983. Dispensing with the the more conventional narrative that they utilized with their previous two movies, they opted for the sketch format that they had become most renowned for with their classic TV series. Given the foreseeable hysteria that had met them with the controversy surrounding their magnum opus, Life of Brian; it might have felt like something of a relief that their last offering was not met with same outraged devour. That's not say there Isn't anything contentious or potentially offensive however as they up the bad taste and vulgarity factor to inspired effect. From challenging Roman Catholic Dogma with their elaborate, showstopping Every Sperm is Sacred musical routine to John Cleese playing a public schoolmaster teaching sexual education to is pupils by having sexual intercourse with his wife in front of them; it has moments of perverse brilliance. Team member Michael Palin himself noted that that it's increased budget of $9 million meant they could afford to be more "daring and dark".

Accompanied by Terry Gilliam's short film, The Crimsons Permanent Assurance, a typically surreal prelude to what's to come. Showcasing his aesthetically distinctive style that show was utilized to greater prominence with his first solo directorial work; Time Bandits, and later with 1985's; Brazil. Concerning a group of elderly office clerks who work in a a small accounting firm, they figuratively throw off the shackles of their employment by rebelling against their corporate bosses. Becoming pirates they turn their office building in to one big ship, and pillage financial areas. Gilliam's short would be amusingly woven in to the fabric of the subsequent film due to a interruption, and a voice over apologizing for it "due to an attack by the supporting feature."

Director Terry Jones who took sole directorial duties as he did with Life of Brian does a bang up job, and the film does have something of an overall more polished feel than the last two films, largely due to it's larger budget. He still never the less displays his considerable prowess and no more so in the aforementioned musical number. However further musical moments that include Eric Idle's quirky and colourful rendition of The Galaxy Song, which examines the humbling nature of the vastness of the Universe and our relative insignificance is truly inspired. It is complimented by visually magnificent high-tech computer generated sequence, that while dated now would have impressed movie-going audience back then.

Arguably most memorable however and for it's vomit inducing bad taste is the sketch entitled "The Autumn of Our Years", which introduces the glutinous and grotesquely overweight Mr. Creosote as portrayed by Jones. A vile, repulsive character who disgustingly stuffs his face in a restaurant (where he is served by John Cleese's caricatured french waiter) to such an extreme that it culminates with a memorable gross out punchline of eye-popping proportions. Amusingly when the The Meaning of Life won the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, he joked that it might have been because Orson Welles, who was on the judging panel, identified with Mr. Creosote.

Where it fails to completely hang together as a cohesive whole is it suffers although not frequently from self indulgence. It's at times strange for the sake of being strange to some degree, and while it does work at times it results in a scene involving two insanely bizarre characters played by Jones and fellow team member, Graham Chapman in a segment called "Find the Fish". Also the sketch format, which worked well for myself personally as an enthusiastic Python fan would not had the same appeal for a general mainstream audience. With the film just taking under $15 million at the box office as opposed to Life of Brian's $20 million that strikes me as likely being the case. And given that one member of the team stated that the main theme and concept of the film was so they could weave together a series of unrelated sketches, you feel as if they weren't quite as committed to their endeavour and the impetus behind the movie was a shallow attempt to profit off of their success.

Even so, looking at the end product as it stands, they still invested much creative effort even if it doesn't quite reaching the dizzying heights their first two proper movies. (And Now For Something Completely Different was nothing more than a collection of their sketches from the TV series which were re-shot for American film audiences in an attempt to introduce their brand of comedy to the U.S. market) Inventive and more polished due to less financial constraints which still doesn't guarantee high quality, it's an outing that I still enjoy revisiting when I get the chance, and still gains a stamp of approval from dedicated fans

Reviewed by Bella 8 / 10

Really Great

I thought that this film was hilarious and it had me chuckling out loud. I really liked the skit that they make their boss walk the plank and then turn their office building into a vehicle and travel into a city and then swing into the window and get into a sword fight. It is an epic battle and the narration is amusing as well. The cinematography was great as well. There were no shaking shots and everything that was meant to be seen in the shot was clear. The songs were hilarious. The Meaning Of Life was my favourite one. The lyrics and video to go along with it are both hilarious. I would recommend this film for older audiences as it contains adult themes.

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