The Lady in the Van

2015

Action / Biography / Comedy / Drama

11
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 92%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 75%
IMDb Rating 6.7 10 19387

Synopsis


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Cast

Maggie Smith as Miss Shepherd
Dominic Cooper as Actor
James Corden as Market Trader
Jim Broadbent as Underwood
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
757.28 MB
1280*682
English
PG - 13
23.976 fps
1hr 44 min
P/S 1 / 18
1.58 GB
1920*1024
English
PG - 13
23.976 fps
1hr 44 min
P/S 2 / 8

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Raj Doctor 6 / 10

Winner All the Way Maggie Smith as Miss Shepherd -

This is a true story that Alan Bennett wrote about a homeless lady Miss Shepherd who stayed in a van on the street near his house in seventies.

The character of Alan Bennett is played excellently by Alex Jennings -who is always talking with his alter ego in the house, while he is scribbling his new play and notes in his book.

The portrayal of Miss Shepherd is portrayed by Maggie Smith - and she lives the eccentric character - living under the skin. All awards - won or nominated were for Maggie Smith's brilliant performance.

The story is about this girl Mary or Margaret (the younger version played by Clare Hammond) who is a gifted pianist, aspires to become a nun, but because of her argumentative nature is thrown away and admitted by her brother to an asylum from where she runs away and at one point in her life - has a car accident in which a young motor- cyclist dies. She does not report the incident and always blames herself - living under the fear that one day she might be arrested for the crime.

There are several layers in the character of Miss Mary Shepherd that we come to know with each small episode she has with a big hearted Alan Bennett - who hesitantly gives her a temporary place to part the vehicle in front of his house, then in his empty front park - and that beautiful bond of LOVE relationship continues for 15 years till she dies.

The real Miss Shepherd died in 1986, and she was granted a placard on the house of Alan Bennett by the community she lived in - which stands even today.

The movie has wonderful chatty conversations and dialogues between Alan and Alan's alter ego interrupting Alan and Mary's conversations - that are sometimes hilarious Very well written and adapted screenplay from the memoir written by Alan Bannett by the same name.

Made on a budget of USD 6 million, the movie has raked in more than USD 40 million worldwide.

The Director Nicholas Hytner has done a commendable job in sticking to the authenticity of the narrative.

What is beautiful about the character of Miss Shepherd is her unwillingness to leave her life on any one else's terms. Her stubbornness and whimsical eccentric nature holds on true to the humor and empathy she evokes.

All is done well with the humanity and out-reach of Alan Bennett who though shies to recognize to his credit the give immortality to this affable character of Miss Shepherd by his memoir and later by this movie.

The movie makes us sensitive to the way old people are neglected and suffer and how they need some support and LOVE from someone - although strangers.

The memoir has also been enacted as a popular play in United Kingdom.

I would go with 6.75 out of 10 for this nice to watch movie

Reviewed by Mrbrown43 7 / 10

Lady in the van: Maggie Smith's homeless adventure.

Lady in the Van (2015) tells the true story of Alan Bennett's (Alex Jennings) uneasy friendship with an homeless elderly woman (Maggie Smith) who stayed in his driveway in a series of vans for 15 years. Over the course of those years he learns about the series of events that caused Mary Shepard to become homeless.

Despite the possible grim subject matter of being homeless and suffering from the mental stress that comes from being homeless and guilt from past mistakes, the film maintains a fairly light-heated tone that makes the some of the bleaker aspects have more of an impact as well as make it more digestible. The trouble with these types of movies is that there is very little I can say about it that is not spoiling a joke or a major plot development. However what I can talk about is the performances.

Maggie Smith is amazing, flat out amazing. She captures every scene she is in, whether it is insulting Alan Bennett or anyone around her or showing how badly old age decays her physical and mental health, the film also displays how a series of events led her into the terrible state she is in at the time of the film. Alex Jennings is great too, in fact everyone is great in this, and they deliver their lines with perfect comedic timing and grace that always ends in laughs.

The writing for the first and second act oozes wit and charm, none of it feels forced for comedic effect or heavy handed. It keeps the pace flowing smoothly and is after all the film's most valuable assist. However this sadly becomes badly apparent in the third act.

I will not give away any spoilers but it tries to introduce a Meta narrative that works as well into the pace and previous type of narrative as one running a hand over a cactus does to ease pain. It hurts the film and reduces what could have been a overall pleasant and haunting movie into a silly feature that thinks it is cleverer then it is.

I did enjoy the film and I would watch it again. It is just a shame that the final act decides it wants to change the narrative in that the film had not earned or needed.

Reviewed by Richard Harvey 9 / 10

Perfectly pitched and paced

Unusually, the user reviews here are, almost all, well-considered, and there is little useful to add. Music, cinematography, editing, lighting all support the consistent high standard of acting and direction. The themes - compassion, loneliness, manipulation, love, old age and so on - are teased out in careful Bennett fashion. We are engaged and entranced by a film that does not disappoint, yet does not seek to promise more than it can deliver. I saw Maggie Smith play a youthful Desdemona to Laurence Olivier's Othello, and this, at the other extent of her acting life, is as riveting performance as I can remember.

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