The Horror of Frankenstein

1970

Drama / Horror / Sci-Fi

4
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 56%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 41%
IMDb Rating 5.8 10 1788

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 6,666 times
August 20, 2018 at 10:55 PM

Director

Cast

David Prowse as The Monster
Dennis Price as The Graverobber
Jon Finch as Lt. Henry Becker
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
778.87 MB
1204*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 35 min
P/S 4 / 4
1.5 GB
1792*1072
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 35 min
P/S 5 / 14

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by BA_Harrison 8 / 10

An unfairly maligned Frankenstein flick from Hammer.

By the 1970s, Hammer was struggling to find an audience still willing to cough up to see lavish Gothic productions; as a result, their output became increasingly targeted at the more profitable youth market. Having been exposed to more explicit teen horror films from the US, this particular demographic demanded that the studio adapt its format to suit. Graphic gore and nudity now had precedence over fog-shrouded graveyards and creepy castles.

In accordance with this new approach, The Horror of Frankenstein presents its viewers with a decidedly different take on Mary Shelley's classic: it's a sexier, nastier, gorier, and generally far more exploitative effort than any previous film in the series, and one which benefits greatly from a deliciously twisted script loaded with gallows humour.

This shake-up also called for a new leading man: out went Peter Cushing's well respected, but severely obsessive scientist, and in came Ralph Bates' more loathsome incarnation of Victor Frankenstein—a younger, mean-spirited, murderous, and cold-blooded individual. Bate's performance is practically perfect, convincingly portraying the utter contempt that his character feels for all mankind—even his closest friends and admirers.

Also rather memorable, albeit for completely different reasons, are the obligatory hammer babes: Kate O'Mara as Alys, the slutty housemaid who sees to the Baron's every needs (if you know what I mean), and Veronica Carlson as Elizabeth Heiss, the prettiest girl in the village and Victor's secret admirer. Both girls are absolutely stunning and possess quite impressive 'talents' (which, particularly in O'Mara's case, regularly threaten to spill completely out over the top of their costumes!).

Many Hammer aficionados seem to have a problem with The Horror of Frankenstein, unable to appreciate its wicked sense of humour. I however, think that it is an extremely fun flick, and a refreshing change to the usual Hammer style. The only gripe I do have with the film is that the monster itself (played by Dave 'Darth Vader' Prowse) is rather weak in its conception: with a little more time and effort spent on the creature make-up FX (the stitching looks like it was drawn on with marker pens), he wouldn't have been quite so laughable.

7.5 out of 10, rounded up to 8 for IMDb.

Reviewed by KDWms 6 / 10

one person's junk is another person's treasure

To clarify, it's really no treasure, but, neither do I agree with the consensus. As of this writing, other comments are overwhelmingly negative. But I don't think that this flick is all that bad. Sure - it's a temptation to compare it to other Hammer films and Frankenstein movies in general. But, because Peter Cushing and Boris Karloff aren't in it, THAT shouldn't be held against Horror of Frankenstein. (They weren't in Citizen Kane, either, but THAT'S a pretty good pic.) I'm guilty of too much comparing, myself, but, for some reason, I did not do it here. Maybe that's why I rated it "respectable". I'm satisfied with most aspects of this production, although, admittedly, the outset is a bit dialogue-heavy and action-starved. It takes a long, mundane time, but, through it all, we meet (among others), sociopathic med student, Victor Frankenstein; his straight-as-an-arrow classmate, Wilhelm; destitute-destined neighbor, Elizabeth; the buxom housekeeper (but lousy cook), Alys; the one-step-behind police lieutenant, Henry Becker; the good-at-what-he-does body and parts supplier and his widow; and, of course, the towering, impetuous monster. It has an easy-to-follow story, with enough Hammer cleavage... urrr, diversions... to make it interesting. This attempt is okay, in my book.

Reviewed by Witchfinder General 666 6 / 10

No Peter Cushing - No Frankenstein?

Being a huge fan of Hammer's brilliant Frankenstein cycle starring the immortal Peter Cushing, I delayed the viewing of "The Horror of Frankenstein" (1970) several times, convinced that a Hammer Frankenstein without Cushing could only be disappointing. Having finally seen it a few nights ago, I must say that, while the film is nowhere near as great as the Cushing Frankensteins, I actually liked it quite a bit. My main concern before seeing this film was that nobody but Peter Cushing could effectively play Baron Victor Frankenstein in a Hammer film. While he is definitely not en par with Cushing, however, Ralph Bates is actually very convincing in his role of a younger, and very different Baron Frankenstein here. Actually, I must say that Bates' performance as a very cynical and cold-hearted Frankenstein is one of the greatest aspects of this film. I did not like how Frankenstein became a pure villain in this one, but that can hardly be blamed on Bates. Peter Cushing's Frankenstein character was obsessed and unscrupulous, but he was also likable and did what he did convinced of doing what was best for mankind (though he became quite villainous in "Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed" of 1969). The young, arrogant and entirely cold-blooded Frankenstein in this film shares none of these positive character traits, which is a bit of a shame. That being said, Bates gives the character a glorious touch of sarcasm, which made the film enjoyable. In the beginning, the film annoys with pseudo-funny episodes in Frankenstein's youth, but it gets a lot better after a while when he has reached adulthood. Frankenstein is a womanizing cynic who has no scruples whatsoever in order to reach his goals. Two incredibly beautiful women, his maid Alys (Kate O'Mara) and his former schoolmate Elisabeth (Veronica Carlson) fall for him, yet his only true dedication is the creation of artificial life.

"The Horror of Frankenstein" was directed by Jimmy Sangster, who is mainly famous as the masterly screenwriter of many Hammer classics, including such milestones as "The Curse of Frankenstein" (1957), "Dracula" (1958) and "The Brides of Dracula" (1960). Sangster deserves a lot of praise for his magnificent writing work. His work as a director is less memorable, it includes this film, the equally mediocre "Lust for a Vampire" (1971) as well as "Fear in the Night" (1972), which I haven't yet seen. Unlike other Hammer the Frankensteins, which all had a original and innovative storyline, this one merely repeats the story of Frankenstein's first creation, which had already been told (in an incomparably superior manner) in "The Curse of Frankenstein" (1957). The monster in this one is quite a letdown, and I was surprised to see David Prowse, who would later become world-famous as Darth Vader, perform so poorly in the role. I couldn't say whether it was the fault of Prowse or director Jimmy Sangster, but, the monster looks real silly here and seems like an angry thug rather than a real monster. Prowse would also play a monster of Frankenstein's creation in "Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell" (1974), the last film by legendary director Terence Fisher, starring Peter Cushing as the Baron. The makeup was way better in that film, one of Hammer's best, and so was Prowse's performance. "The Horror of Frankenstein" has some atmosphere, Frankenstein's castle laboratory is a terrific setting, and it also has its moments otherwise, but it certainly isn't too memorable. Overall it wasn't nearly as disappointing as I feared, and therefore a positive surprise. "The Horror of Frankenstein" is recommendable to my fellow Hammer fans, but only AFTER seeing all of the marvelous Frankenstein films with Peter Cushing.

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