The Great Dictator


Action / Comedy / Drama / War

Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 92%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 95%
IMDb Rating 8.5 10 162532


Uploaded By: OTTO
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October 02, 2011 at 11:17 AM


Charles Chaplin as Hynkel - Dictator of Tomania / A Jewish Barber
Hans Conried as Undetermined Role
Henry Daniell as Garbitsch
651.38 MB
23.976 fps
2hr 5 min
P/S 9 / 153

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by lugonian 9 / 10

The Man With Hitler's Face

"The Great Dictator" (United Artists, 1940), became the long awaited talking debut of silent film comedian, Charlie Chaplin (who also wrote and directed), in a political satire on Adolph Hitler, only the way Chaplin dared to do at the time. He plays a Jewish barber and Hynkel, dictator of Tomania. Some of the humor cannot really be absorbed at first glance, but after repeated viewing, it gets better. My personal classic moment occurs with Chaplin in the barber shop working on a bald-headed customer by giving him a shave while listening to a classical composition on the radio, never missing a beat. Co-starring opposite Chaplin for the second and final time is Paulette Goddard as Hannah. Goddard became the only Chaplin leading lady to ever make a success on her own while the others just drifted to "B" movies or faded away. Jack Oakie as Napaloni, the Dictator of Bacteria (a spoof on Mussolini), appears late in the story but shares with Chaplin some of its brilliant comedic moments. Both Chaplin and Oakie earned Academy Award nominations for their performances (Chaplin for Best Actor/Oakie for Best Supporting Actor), but no wins. Henry Daniell as Garbitsch and Reginald Gardiner as Schultz also share the spotlight. Aside from Chaplin's screenplay in poking fun of its then current issues on European invasion by the Nazis, "The Great Dictator" expertly blends satire with dramatic overtones. Its closing scene in which Chaplin makes a speech pleading for all people to follow the path of peace, brotherhood and democracy, is not to be missed. Whether this movie is above or beyond the Marx Brothers' "Duck Soup" (Paramount, 1933) is anyone's matter of taste. (***)

Reviewed by arwkoppen 1 / 10


It is supposed to be such a great movie, but I didn't like it. There is no humour that appeals, it is all too weak. The only good thing about it was the speech the jewish barber made in the end.

Reviewed by DonAlberto 9 / 10

The Great Dictator

Do it all yourself and do it all right. This is what Charlie Chaplin does in this brilliant film. He's the producer, star, scriptwriter and director of The Great Dictator, his firs talkie (sound movie). And one can't help but wondering if the art of this British genius was somewhat affected by the arrival of sound, by the changes that it brought about both for actors and audiences. Judging by how good the film is, I'd say that it didn't.

A.Hynkel is the dictator and absolute ruler of Tomaine. This role and the one of a Jewish barber are both played by Chaplin. Although the picture is aimed at criticizing Germany and fascism, the first scenes are used to show us Chalie Chaplin's character fighting in the Great War. Comic scenes are intertwined with satire-driven ones, which only increases the difficulty to know where this masterpiece stands. Its legendary status and reputation are undeniable but.....Is it a comedy? Is it a drama? Does it stand alone on a genre of its own? I guess that's up to the viewers. I can only say I see no easy way out of that dilemma, as we have a little bit of everything in the film. realistic depiction of Jews and their struggles, critique of Hitler, Mussolini and fascism through humour. There's one poignant speech at the end of the film that serves in a double purpose: to close the movie in a spectacular fashion and to give us something to cheer us up, something to remember and hold on to in moments of despair.

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