The Go-Between

1971

Drama / Romance

4
IMDb Rating 7.4 10 4121

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Jim Broadbent as Spectator at Cricket Match
Julie Christie as Marian - Lady Trimingham
Michael Gough as Mr. Maudsley
Roger Lloyd Pack as Charles
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
945.31 MB
1280*682
English
NR
24 fps
1hr 56 min
P/S 14 / 47
1.82 GB
1920*1024
English
NR
24 fps
1hr 56 min
P/S 23 / 64

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by M. J Arocena 10 / 10

The Past Is A Foreign Country

To sit through "The Go-Between" again, after years - maybe 20 - since the first time I saw it, turned out to be an almost religious experience. Harold Pinter adapted L P Hartley's novel and Joseph Losey directed - Lose, a blacklisted American who became one of the pillars of British Cinema in the 60's - think "The Servant" or "Accident" - Then, of course, Julie Christie, sublime. Alan Bates at his pick and the spectacular Margaret Leighton ensure that "The Go Between" will always be alive and relevant. Dominic Guard is wonderful in the title role as well as Michael Gough and Edward Fox. Michel Legrand and his score are the only elements who seem rooted in 1971. The film opens with the line "The past is a foreign Country...." Yes indeed, I believe that that applies to film too because in the past, even a recent past, is like a foreign Country, even a close and friendly Country, people behave differently there, then.

Reviewed by Framescourer 7 / 10

Nicely composed English meditation on history, memory and sex

Losey/Pinter's adaptation of LP Hartley's novel follows Leo, invited to spend the summer with his upper crust schoolfriend's family in Norfolk. He contracts a bit of a crush on Julie Christie's Marian (his friend's older sister) and consequently gets drawn into the awkward, tacit love triangle between her fiancée Trimingham (Fox) and masculine local farmer Ted (Bates). Losey interpolates brief, silent flash-forwards to the present day as Leo revisits the area to speak with Marian in her dotage.

If one has seen, or, more pertinently, read Atonement (Joe Wright's film on Ian McEwan's book) then you'll be familiar with the themes and, in part, composition of The Go-Between. Leo divines the sexual tension and intent of the relationship between Marian and Ted but, being not only young but also uninitiated in the implicit obligations of the upper class, cannot understand why Marian is simultaneously agreeing to her union with Trimingham. Unlike Atonement, Leo doesn't wilfully interfere with the relationships. Instead he does act as a catalyst that allows them to happen and is consequently affected by the outcome - the final sequence is a dryly tragic denouement which recalls the TV interview epilogue of Atonement; only here there is no atonement to be made or had.

The film is beautifully and unequivocally shot. The past may indeed be a different country, as the voice-over tells us but it's not a figment of the imagination. The acting is very good, with the exception of the younger Maudsleys who are weak. Michel Legrand's score is a cunning set of neo-baroque variations for piano, rendered oppressively rather like the society and heat. Losey's handling of the drizzled flash-forwards is a beautifully rendered conceit that really makes the film for me: wistful, English and eloquent. 7/10

Reviewed by MARIO GAUCI 8 / 10

THE GO-BETWEEN (Joseph Losey, 1970) ***1/2

Richly-detailed period romantic drama, told more or less from a child's viewpoint but treated with the maturity one has come to expect from a Losey film (the main plot is interspersed with fragmented clips of the boy as an old man - played by Sir Michael Redgrave - revisiting the aristocratic country estate where the majority of the narrative takes place).

Though the characters are rather swamped by their surroundings (the two leads are particularly subdued) - as captured by the gleaming cinematography of Gerry Fisher and the elegant décor of Carmen Dillon - the film allows for several good performances from a sturdy cast, including Dominic Guard (as the boy Leo who acts as messenger in the impossible love between upper-class Julie Christie and commoner Alan Bates, both of whom he idolizes), Edward Fox (as Christie's intended, a war-hero), as well as Margaret Leighton and Michael Gough (as her parents); Leighton's role remains in the background for most of the time but, then, she asserts herself during the last third to bring down the couple's relationship - with the unwilling assistance of the bewildered Guard. Besides, Michel Legrand contributes an atypically ominous yet haunting score.

This was the third and last time Losey and screenwriter Harold Pinter worked together, constituting a very fruitful and quite extraordinary collaboration; for about two-thirds of its length, the film finds Losey somewhere near his best - the contemporary subplot where Leo reprises his 'services' for an older Christie works less well, in my opinion (and is too sketchily presented anyway), rendering an already deliberately-paced film somewhat overlong!

THE GO-BETWEEN won the Golden Palm at the Cannes Film Festival, was nominated for an impressive 12 BAFTA awards (winning 4) but received only 1 Oscar nomination (for Leighton as Best Supporting Actress).

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