The Artist


Action / Comedy / Drama / Romance

Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 97%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 88%
IMDb Rating 7.9 10 207496


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 146,796 times
March 10, 2012 at 12:09 PM


John Goodman as Al Zimmer
Missi Pyle as Constance
Malcolm McDowell as The Butler
Bitsie Tulloch as Norma
650.91 MB
23.976 fps
1hr 40 min
P/S 16 / 77

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by luckyfay-34-545425 9 / 10

Incredibly effective

I saw this in Cannes, couldn't believe from the blurb that it could be as stunning as it was. Deserves all the accolades it has received.

Reviewed by Michael Ledo 8 / 10

No one wants to see me speak

This is a good movie, but it typically one that is overrated because it shows some kind of class, intellect and refinement to proclaim itself as genius. The production starts with 3 strikes against it. First, at times, it is a movie within a movie. Second, it is in black and white, and third, it is mostly all silent. With all the rave, I was willing to attempt an open mind viewing (zombie films are sometimes in black and white too).

These techniques were done to to give us the flavor of the films of the era. Even though those restored masters are available, who among the 5 star rave reviewers watch them? You could list them on one hand, or maybe one finger. In the silent era, the jokes were visual. The sound track created the mood, more so than it does today, and actors had to make dramatic movements to create emotions. They used their face...a term called "mugging" in the film. This was brilliantly brought out in the film, although we already knew that.

The film uses symbolism, such as when our star George Valentin's (Jean Dujardin)career is sinking, it shows him in a film sinking in quicksand. Good yes. Genius? Hardly. The script reminded me of "A Star is Born" (pick one) where a star launches the career of a new star only to see his fade. George is "The Artist" who believes talkies are not art. Besides the studio no longer wants George. They want fresh faces such as rising star Peppy Miller (Bérénice Bejo).

I liked the idea of doing the silent movie film to show us the transition from silent to talkies, I just didn't like the predictable script. Plot is important.

No f-bombs, sex, or nudity. You should be able to read lips after this film.

Reviewed by OnlyNick 8 / 10

The Film That Says A Lot By Staying Silent

I'll be short and unusually sweet.

I like the way this movie was made. I like it even more that others have not tried to replicate it since (so far). I'll keep my 'talkies' thank you very much.

From a technical side, the 'full screen' aspect ratio didn't take too long to get used to, in part because the film itself didn't take too long to get into. The design of the picture, everything about it, brings you back and allows you to believe. That's the great thing about movies, they can carry you to a time and era you've never experienced just so you can experience it.

I noticed right away how 'plain' the set decoration and lighting were back then. It would pain me to light a project like this because it's so simple and dull. The DP, Guillaume Schiffman, did do a fantastic job, and like the actors, had to learn a new technique to do his job I'm sure. It's so simple, it works on every level.

About half way through I began to realize how difficult acting in a silent film really is. As an actor in a silent picture you have to work really hard at getting your point across to the audience in actions, and not words; "mugging" as character Peppy Miller puts it. In saying that, the actors in this film would have had to train a little differently at being a silent film actor because all they've ever known are 'talkies' and their training as actors follow that basic necessity of today's movies - sound! In today's world, acting is more than just movement.

The Oscar for Best Picture is well deserved. Although this isn't a movie I'll watch over and over, it was a nice switch.

Read more IMDb reviews


Be the first to leave a comment