Shadows and Fog


Action / Comedy

Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 52%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 56%
IMDb Rating 6.8 10 14312


Uploaded By: LINUS
Downloaded 4,509 times
November 16, 2015 at 01:46 PM



Peter Dinklage as Circus Performer
Jodie Foster as Prostitute
John Cusack as Student Jack
Woody Allen as Kleinman
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
518.17 MB
23.976 fps
1hr 25 min
P/S 1 / 2
1.41 GB
23.976 fps
1hr 25 min
P/S 1 / 1

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Ian 8 / 10

Woody Allen fans and open-minded liberals will love it.

Yes, it's old and I'm coming late to the party having just seen it but it's one of the few Woody Allen movies I hadn't yet seen.

I'm normally very, very wary of writers/directors but there are a few exceptions and Woody Allen is one. I tend to think he's a love or hate type of writer/director but I come out on the side of love. He usually plays bumbling, nervous, self-depreciating characters which are very endearing and I love the Jewish humour.

A couple of choice lines: "I've never paid for sex in my life" "Oh, honey, you just think you haven't!

And so it goes...

The cast is a list of A-list actors. Many queue to work in a Woody Allen movie. Ok, just to say I'm keeping his private life out of this. That may affect your perception of the man but it should not effect of your enjoyment of his movies. Some people don't want to make a distinction and many people are happy to assume an automatic presumption of 'guilty before proven innocent' which seems to be where we're heading with this but that's another argument altogether.

The movie, like many of Allen's movies, is more an intellectual treat than belly laugh guffaws but his characters' responses and one-liners are classics, and hilarious, even if the laugh's in your brain rather than your gut!

Like some of his movies, it's a delicious satire, particularly on society and religion. This, and the barbed pieces of irony which most Americans probably won't get, make it, to non-US viewers, all the more delicious. Sort of. Sorry American friends. Oy vey...

Anyway, this is a superbly intellectually funny movie with more than enough digs at sociale mores to warrant any open-minded viewer to roll around the floor laughing, even mentally.

Woody Allen fans and open-minded liberals will love it.

Reviewed by HotToastyRag 2 / 10

A little hap-hazard

If you're a film student, you've got a much better chance of liking this movie. I've read that Woody Allen made this as an homage to German Expressionist filmmakers, like F.W. Murnau. It's a black-and-white movie, utilizing the two elements in the title, Shadows and Fog, to make the scenes extra spooky and European-looking. For the rest of you out there, this probably won't be your favorite Woody Allen movie. The plot is jumbled and hap-hazard, with a bookie in charge of solving a string of murders and a travelling circus coming into town.

All in all, this one's a little sinister and confusing, but if you like Woody Allen's darker movies, or you just like renting all his movies no matter how good they are, you might want to rent this one. Just don't expect a joke fest. The famous faces you'll see in this one besides Woody himself and his sweetie-pie at the time, Mia Farrow, are David Ogden Stiers, Jodie Foster, Kathy Bates, James Rebhorn, John Malkovich, Donald Pleasence, Madonna, Wallace Shawn, Julie Kavner, John Cusack, Fred Gwynne, Lily Tomlin, William H. Macy, Philip Bosco, Kate Nelligan, and John C. Reilly.

Reviewed by oOoBarracuda 7 / 10

Shadows and Fog

After completing Shadows and Fog, I found myself once again dismayed by the common claim that Woody Allen makes the same type of film over and over again. In reality, Woody has always been open to trying new and untested things both with his narrative structure and his filmmaking style. Shadows and Fog is another perfect example of Woody's penchant for diverse filmmaking. The 1991 film was Woody Allen's gentle homage to German Expressionism. Shadows and Fog pairs Woody Allen and Mia Farrow in a shadowy town that hides from a strangler that is on the loose. As is the usual Woody Allen film, Shadows and Fog is as wonderfully comedic as it is a thoughtful exercise in grappling with life's deepest questions.

Kleinman (Woody Allen) is a nebbish, nervous bookkeeper who has been pulled into a plot by a group of vigilantes to hunt for a strangler that has been terrorizing their area. A perpetually nervous individual, Kleinman wants nothing to do with a group of lawless men seeking out a murderer. Kleinman would rather stay locked in his apartment safely away from the murderer roaming the streets. To make matters worse, despite the fact that Kleinman has been roped into a group of vigilantes, information about his role in the group is being withheld from him. Sheepishly attempting to find his role within the vigilante group, all the while desperately trying to avoid putting himself in real danger, Kleinman encounters a woman in a traveling circus, Irmy (Mia Farrow) who is also attempting to find her way through life in a much more metaphorical sense. Kindred spirits, Kleinman and Irmy attempt to find a purpose for their lives, all the while trying to save them.

Shadows and Fog works perfectly as a nod to German Expressionism, with gorgeous imagery reminiscent of the greats of the genre such as Robert Wiene and Fritz Lang. Woody Allen's frequent use of black and white photography well into the 90's is a fearless maneuver that deserves uproarious applause. Woody is a filmmaker that uses a variety of film technique achieving artistic significance yet is hardly acknowledged for that. Certain aspects Woody is commonly acknowledged for are present in Shadows and Fog, for instance, it is exquisitely written and has a brilliant sound design. Shadows and Fog is another worthy mention in my crusade to prove that Woody Allen is not a filmmaker that has a clear section of "lower-tier" work, as he is often accused.

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