Rosemary's Baby

1968

Action / Drama / Fantasy / Horror

154
IMDb Rating 0 10 0

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Tony Curtis as Donald Baumgart
Mia Farrow as Rosemary Woodhouse
Charles Grodin as Dr. Hill
John Cassavetes as Guy Woodhouse
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
899.98 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
2hr 17 min
P/S 4 / 41
1.80 GB
1920*1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
2hr 17 min
P/S 2 / 51

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by DonAlberto 8 / 10

Rosemary's baby

After having ordered and watched 3 of the best Roman Polanski's movies in a row -Chinatown, The tenant, Rosemary's baby- I'm inclined towards putting Rosemary's baby at the same level of Chinatown. Of course they don't have anything to do with each other but the whiff of great cinema is as strong in one as it is in the other. Chinatown went down in the history of cinema as a landmark movie that meant a utter turn-around of the genre both in terms of themes the plot or sub-plots are shaped around and storytelling; however Rosemary's baby doesn't fall short in its attempt of telling a horror story in a new and original way.

To define myself as a expert on Horror films would be nothing short of cockiness, an unnecessary amount of showing this review isn't worthy of having. So, don't worry dear reader, I'll be honest and declare that I'm treading on water when it comes to this genre. There is something I know, though. And that it's when a movie hits you, makes you want to feel what the characters feel and be the characters themselves so to better comprehend what they are going through. The story appears to be quite simple: a young couple moves in to an apartment only to be surrounded by peculiar neighbors and occurrences. When the wife becomes mysteriously pregnant, paranoia over the safety of her unborn child takes over her life.

What makes this movies stands out is the way in which is told. Every little piece bit of mystery is carefully given away at the exact moment, which only adds to the viewer's sense of fear and tension. Here there's nothing of a hidden monster that somehow breaks free from his owners and develops a never ending human-driven appetite. That might be the scope of 70 or 80% of movies of the genre; not in this case. What would you rather see: horror/terror only hinted at or a close-up on a horror scene? My choice is clear and I hope yours is too. The tension is so well build up that at times seems as if Polanski was a musical composer conducting an orquestra of seasoned musicians. You, as a viewer, are never let down because the essential ups and downs in tension are masterly handled; never it feels too much to diggest, never it is too low to keep the scrypt from going forward. I guess the comparison is worth elaborating on: the cast is fantastic, namely Mia Farrow as Rosemary. Only she could convey such fragility and determination to keep going through until the very ending of the picture. One that reaps the benefits of having carefully planted across the films "seeds of horror" and of having been able to create a plot that's as luring and riveting as it is crammed with twists and turns. Let me sign off by formulating a question: Is a mother always a mother?

Reviewed by Ian Rastall 10 / 10

A Comedy For Sadists

Polanski had already revealed a penchant for cruelty in his previous films, as well as the sadist's core belief that innocence equals victimhood and victimhood is a character defect that justifies cruelty. In "Repulsion" we get some voyeuristic fanservice of a fragile, virginal character (thanks to some careful lighting). In "Fearless Vampire Killers" we see the joke is that fearlessness has made the heroes into victims. But in "Rosemary's Baby" Polanski has created an entire film to be served up as delicious comedy to those in the know.

The film needs Rosemary (think Virgin Mary, think thorns) to be innocent and weak. Sadists would see that right away as deliciously inviting. (If she were the girl at the beginning of Salo, those four monstrous men would indeed be on their feet at her pleas for help). She's in a web, and her future is already decided. That's one notable thing about this film. Her fate is already decided before the film starts, and we're just watching her approach that grim end helplessly.

As one finds in transgressive cinema, or in, say, the writings of the Marquis de Sade, a sadist's fantasy would not be complete without a momentary escape for the victim. A seeming end to the madness. And we get that. Cruelty depends on crushing hope. Of course she is broken finally, and at that moment of tragedy made to submit to her captors.

Her increasing hysteria is meant to be funny. Maybe to "straight" audiences -- or at least straight audiences unaware of the tropes of sadism -- this is scary. But I don't think it's really supposed to be that way.

With all this going on in the background, "Rosemary's Baby" works very well on repeat viewings. It doesn't matter how down with the comedy you are. Study yields endless (bitter) fruit. And I can see why people say it's cursed. (Probably a myth.) It remains one of the most evil films ever released.

Of course it also represents Polanski at a creative peak, and that's saying something. "Knife In The Water" and "Repulsion" were masterpieces in their own right, but this is a tour de force. Worth studying, for the camera, for the performances, for the atmosphere and detail -- as well as for the transgression beneath the suspense.

Reviewed by fjk1138-731-161881 10 / 10

Horror at its finest

Rosemary's Baby is easily one of the best horror movies ever made. There is no blood, gore, or modern violence. But it works on multiple psychological levels that modern horror movies can't seem to touch. Does Rosemary hallucinate? Does she confuse her dreams with reality? Do people want to hurt her baby? Superb acting all around, and all the actors steal the scenes in their own ways. People of strong Christian faith will probably find the last few minutes to be shocking, but what shocked me the most is what Rosemary decides at the very end.

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