Ride the Pink Horse

1947

Action / Crime / Drama / Film-Noir / Mystery / Thriller

3
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 100%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 89%
IMDb Rating 7.4 10 1838

Synopsis


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January 26, 2016 at 05:59 AM

Cast

Thomas Gomez as Pancho
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
719.15 MB
988*720
English
23.976 fps
1hr 41 min
P/S 1 / 1
1.52 GB
1472*1072
English
23.976 fps
1hr 41 min
P/S 0 / 5

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Alex da Silva 4 / 10

Ride away to something more interesting

A thoroughly unpleasant Robert Montgomery (Gagin) arrives in a Mexican town to exact revenge on criminal Fred Clark (Hugo) who is responsible for the killing of his army pal. Also on the tail of Clark is diminutive Government Agent Art Smith (Retz). Local girl Wanda Hendrix (Pila) develops a creepy fascination with Montgomery and follows him around for the duration of the film. God knows why. He is horrible to her. And to everyone else. He needs to be bumped off. Is there hope?

This film is boring. The story is a little confusing in relation to the cheque plot line and only the character of Andrea King (Marjorie) convinces. Art Smith is nice enough but no way would he be in such control of a situation as he is when he enters the gangster's hotel room at the end of the film. Thomas Gomez (Pancho) is good enough as the Mexican owner of the roundabout but I was surprised to learn that he was nominated for a best supporting actor award. Why? He was a stereotypical fat, jolly Mexican whose behaviour made no sense at all from the very beginning when he befriended the impossibly unlike-able Montgomery. Montgomery is just plain awful in this and his mouth when he laughs betrays him as slightly retarded looking. He also gets the better hand in a fight against two hardened cut-throat Mexican gangsters – NO WAY! Montgomery wanders around in this film for great long, boring sections and elicits no sympathy whatsoever. This film is not good. And what is the title about? The ending does score the film a point for being different but stronger lead performances could have made this far more effective.

Reviewed by seymourblack-1 8 / 10

A Transformative Experience

Robert Montgomery directs and stars in this offbeat crime drama about an embittered ex-GI who attempts to avenge the death of his wartime buddy by blackmailing his buddy's killer. As the killer is a wealthy, ruthless and very powerful mob boss, the road to revenge proves to be very challenging but more surprisingly, it also proves to be a transformative experience for the would-be blackmailer as well as a route to his own redemption.

World War 11 veteran Lucky Gagin (Robert Montgomery) arrives in a small New Mexican town with a pistol and a bank cheque in his possession. After putting the cheque into a locker in San Pablo's bus depot, he sets off in search of somewhere to stay and after asking a group of young girls for directions, is led to the La Fonda Hotel by a young Native American girl called Pila (Wanda Hendrix). She insists on giving him a good luck charm which she says will protect him and despite his obvious cynicism, Gagin, who is rather disconcerted by the girl's fixed gaze, keeps the gift and soon goes on to discover that all of the local hotels are full because of the number of visitors who are in town for the annual fiesta.

Gagin had come to San Pablo to blackmail the man he knew was responsible for killing his wartime buddy, Shorty Thompson. The man in question is Frank Hugo (Fred Clark), a mobster and fugitive from the American authorities and the bank cheque that Gagin has in his possession constitutes evidence that during his activities as a War profiteer, Hugo had bribed a high-ranking government official.

Gagin visits Hugo's room at the La Fonda Hotel, but after assaulting the mobster's male secretary and meeting his devious moll, discovers that an early meeting won't be possible. After leaving Hugo's room, Gagin is approached by an FBI Agent called Bill Retz (Art Smith) who has been pursuing Hugo for some time and knows exactly what Gagin's got in mind. He tries to deter Gagin from going through with his plan and asks him for the evidence he's got, which could be used to bring Hugo to justice. Gagin refuses to co-operate and later goes to the "Cantina de las Tres Violetas" where he meets the jovial and very friendly Pancho (Thomas Gomez) who generously offers him somewhere to sleep for the night. Pancho is the proprietor of the town's carousel and the accommodation that the two men share for the night is his open- fronted shelter close-by.

When Gagin gets the opportunity to demand $30,000 from Hugo for the incriminating cheque, the partially deaf criminal arranges to meet him at the Tip Top Cafe to do the deal. However, a double-cross follows when Gagin is attacked and stabbed by a couple of Hugo's thugs. Although he kills one of his attackers and seriously wounds the other, Gagin is very badly injured and is later found by Pila who had constantly been following him. Pila and Pancho then nurse him until he determinedly decides to confront Hugo again. What happens on this occasion turns out to be surprising to everyone concerned and contributes to Gagin's life taking a different and better course than he could possibly have expected.

What Gagin had experienced during his military service had left him deeply disillusioned and angry and resulted in him becoming the extremely unpleasant individual that he was when he arrived in San Pablo. The friendship and loyalty that were extended to him by Pila and Pancho came as a huge surprise to him especially as neither of these impoverished individuals had anything to gain from their actions and, in fact, both suffered beatings to protect him. This experience and the unexpected way in which his efforts to blackmail Hugo ended, resulted in him leaving San Pablo as a significantly changed man.

Robert Montgomery's directorial style is very accomplished and his use of a long single take early on in the action has the effect of grabbing and holding his audience's attention extremely successfully. The way in which another sequence is shot when Pancho is brutally beaten in front of some very distressed children on the carousel is also highly effective and makes a great impact.

With its unusual story, sharp dialogue and consistently strong performances, this movie is highly successful in being entertaining and also in making some salient points at the same time.

Reviewed by paradux 7 / 10

watch the strange movie

I am a huge fan of Montgomery.

He starred in two of my all time favorite films, Here Comes Mr. Jordan and The Lady in the Lake (which he also directed).

Here he both stars and directs but unfortunately that is not enough. Films in border towns turned out to be the kiss of death for adventurous Hollywood producers. Even Charlton Heston tried one (actually playing a Mexican!) and it almost ruined his career.

Montgomery has personality, star power, and directing chops to spare. But again, just not enough. The film never gets moving and the faux Mexican overlay (here Wanda Hendrix puts on heavy makeup to play the Mexican love interest) strangles the film in its sleep.

An irony Philip Marlowe would appreciate.

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