Last Kung Fu Monk

2010

Action / Adventure / Comedy / Drama

66
IMDb Rating 4.3 10 431

Synopsis


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720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
692.48 MB
1280*720
English
R
25.000 fps
1hr 33 min
P/S 2 / 1
1.23 GB
1920*1080
English
R
25.000 fps
1hr 33 min
P/S 2 / 2

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by create_possibilities 2 / 10

I'm giving it two stars for the amazing footage of the fights

First let me give you the good news. The fight and training scenes are quite good as is the footage of what appears to be a real monastery and cast of dozens in training. If you're a lover of Kung Fu, you'll agree. I trained in White Crane style for years. That's where the good news ends. Bad news is the script flows as smoothly as sour milk. Acting? No. But there's Kung Fu. Often lacking any reason other than to build up to the next fight, entire scenes appear of little value to the overall movie. The screenplay is choppy, from lighting to camera angle. Dark and grainy, angle unchanged for too long, zooming in on nothing of importance. Add to that a musical score that has that old porn movie quality, volume raising suddenly for seemingly no reason, and the genre of music quite odd for this kind of movie. Reminds me of the art house flicks from the French and Italians. Dialogue is at times smooth, by mostly comical, with more than a few mumbles left in, either slipping past the director and editors, or to save film. An example of the acting is how when one character finishes a line, the other pauses a moment, awkwardly long, and suddenly bursts out with feigned energy, smiles appearing more like a grimace. Sometimes, in response to a light-hearted line, others respond with overdone laughter. Each time my attention began to wane, wonky acting and dialogue with that porn music gave me a great laugh. This movie actually reminds me of classic Kung Fu movies from earlier days, poorly dubbed and shoestring budget. The classics, of course, can be excused. Perhaps it's only artistic genius is that Last Kung Fu Monk has managed to recreate the now farcical old time feel in an effort to make a serious martial arts contender. Shoot for serious, end up at funny. Now that's comedy.

Reviewed by dafrosts 7 / 10

A Monk out of Water

Li is a Shaolin Monk who comes to the States to care for his nephew after his brother and sister-in-law are killed in a car accident. A noble act I grant you. The story goes off-enter from the moment Li arrives in the states. A former student, Dave, offers to open a school with Li. a great idea, as it would be income to support Li's nephew, Michael. However, after seeing how pathetically Dave fights off predators who assault Mei, a waitress at a local restaurant, I'd have serious second and third thoughts about the deal. Nonetheless, Li still opens the school. Sarah, Michael's CSW, at first has no use for Li. She even calls him pathetic when discussing him with her boss. It isn't until Li stops thieves who are cutting through their yard, the Sarah suddenly sees his value. Sarah develops serious Hero worship. She sees Mei as competition for Li's affections, though Li as a Monk, is oblivious to both women. When it comes to light that Dave got the school funding from the Russian Mob, all hell breaks loose. Li has to work a Fight Club in order to save Mei and regain control of his school. The end fights are good. It is slow at times but the action more than makes up for it.

Reviewed by kopilot111 4 / 10

Good background noise

Spoiler: there's nothing beyond the title to indicate the protagonist is anywhere near being the last Shaolin Kung-Fu monk. There is no explanation for this just as there is hardly any apparent motivation for anything anyone in this movie does.

The characters who are supposed to be likable are. There are some OK (and IMHO, only OK) fight sequences.

As some have said, the acting is not very impressive-but considering the sophomoric screenplay it would be hard for the best actors to do anything with their lines.

If you told me this movie was the first written and directed by an aspiring 13-year-old filmmaker, I'd believe it.

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