Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool

2017

Biography / Drama / Romance

8
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 80%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 69%
IMDb Rating 6.8 10 3320

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 48,278 times
March 22, 2018 at 05:22 AM

Director

Cast

Jamie Bell as Peter Turner
Julie Walters as Bella Turner
Annette Bening as Gloria Grahame
Vanessa Redgrave as Jeanne McDougall
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
906.65 MB
1280*534
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 45 min
P/S 2 / 37
1.7 GB
1920*800
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 45 min
P/S 2 / 39

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by TheLittleSongbird 8 / 10

Film quality hasn't died

With such a great cast (Annette Bening, Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, Kenneth Cranham, Stephen Graham, Vanessa Redgrave and Frances Barber) and a fascinating subject matter detailing a passionate true-life romance concerning film noir icon Gloria Grahame and jobbing actor Peter Turner, 'Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool' intrigued me.

On the most part, while not perfect, 'Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool' did not disappoint and did its subject justice. There wasn't much to criticise for me actually, though the quality of the production values left me torn. On one hand, there's lovely costumes and very handsome photography. On the other, some of the sets are garish and lack authenticity and some of the wigs are a fright. Especially Stephen Graham's that looked like it came from an old comedy sketch on loan.

'Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool' however is anchored by Bening at her most fearless and vulnerable and her passionate chemistry with Bell giving the most mature work of his career.

Walters, Cranham and Graham are as expected first class support, particularly Walters. Redgrave and Barber have a terrific scene. Paul McGuigan directs with class.

The elegiac music score adds enormously. The nostalgic atmosphere is evoked beautifully, and the story, while slight, was easy to get behind thanks to the performances, the romance having the passion it does and the emotional resonance of when Grahame's career and health ails. Can't fault the script either, which is full of wit and poignancy.

In short, very intriguing and well done. 8/10 Bethany Cox

Reviewed by tkn10015 8 / 10

A love story with a kick in the gut , anyone?

Frankly, I was upset when Annette Bening did such great work in 20th Century Women, which a few of you saw, and wasn't nominated for an Oscar. Once upon a time in movies, people related to one another in funny, sad and flawed human ways. That was 20th Century Women and Ms. Bening was pushed out at Oscar time by that beloved film icon nominated for yowling and singing painfully off key. A travesty. Booray for Hollywood. Assessing no blame to our nameless beloved scenery chewer because she can't help getting nominated for merely belching, with or without an accent. Now, having been swept away by Film Stars Don't Die In Liverpool, I'm not upset anymore. Ms Bening and Jamie Bell had me at "How do I look?" Tough cookie 50's film star Gloria Grahame stumbled through her life without much love or tenderness. With Jamie Bell's character Peter Turner, she not only found them but allowed them for a little while. I wanted to be there for every moment Gloria and much younger Peter were together. Throw in Julie Walters as Peter's mum, Vanessa Redgrave as Gloria's mom, and, no-slouch-she Frances Barber as Gloria's jealous toxic sister, and you've got a jewel of a film that may or may not get the recognition it deserves. But I've got my memories of the great Julie Walters, as Peter's Mum, crushing me simply saying "time to let go of her, son," and Gloria with her life scars and Peter trying to make it all better for her. And he does. Hollywood can't hurt me or Gloria anymore. She has passed on and my illusions about talent and fine work being rewarded are gone. It could happen though that Ms. Bening, like Elizabeth Taylor before her, gets her Oscar one year and one film later. This time, if it happens, it will be given for this year's best performance by an actress. Because. trust me, it is.

Reviewed by gsygsy 5 / 10

Lack of vision

Annette Bening and Jamie Bell play star-crossed lovers, with the emphasis on 'star'. Ms Bening is, as ever, excellent, this time playing a real-life Hollywood actress, Gloria Grahame, herself a remarkable and original talent. If this film rekindles interest in Ms Grahame's formidable back catalogue of performances, that's no bad thing.

However, FILM STARS...centres on Peter Turner, a jobbing actor whose life takes an unexpected turn when he falls in love with Ms Grahame. As Turner, Jamie Bell, who has developed into an accomplished supporting actor over the years since BILLY ELLIOT, is promoted to leading man. He's excellent. A revelation. Authoritative, sexy, strong, romantic, vulnerable -- you name it, Mr Bell communicates it sincerely, without any sense of artifice. A first-rate performance.

It's a pity that the film is so hand-me-down in other ways. The everlastingly wonderful Julie Walters does everything possible with the stereotypical Liverpool mum that she's been provided with, but neither she nor other stalwarts -- Kenneth Cranham, Stephen Graham, Frances Barber and even Vanessa Redgrave -- can transcend their characters' functionality. Production values are all over the place (the wigs!), while the decision to use back projection for the scenes in New York and California seems to me to demonstrate the inconsistency at the heart of the director's approach. Rather than expressing the rosy glow of memory, which I suspect was the justification, these scenes merely look cheap. It might have been wiser to set the whole thing in a studio, as Joe Wright did with his ANNA KARENINA or Baz Lurhmann with his MOULIN ROUGE. Whatever the flaws of those two movies, the overall artistic vision was equal to the project in hand. I don't think that's the case here, unfortunately.

Read more IMDb reviews

4 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment