Deep Red

1975

Horror / Mystery / Thriller

5
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 95%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 86%
IMDb Rating 7.7 10 24964

Synopsis


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June 19, 2018 at 07:23 AM

Director

Cast

Cyril Cusack as Florist
Dario Argento as Murderer's Hands
David Hemmings as Marcus Daly
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
1.04 GB
1280*544
English
NR
23.976 fps
2hr 6 min
P/S 8 / 29
2.02 GB
1920*816
English
NR
23.976 fps
2hr 6 min
P/S 4 / 29

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Lechuguilla 10 / 10

It Even Has An Intriguing Story

As with other Argento giallos, the accent in "Deep Red" is on the visuals: the artsy sets, the garish lighting, the tendency for the camera to dwell on brutal details. Images are stark, with high contrast in lighting. And there's lots of visual symmetry. Emotionally, "Deep Red" is cold, entirely appropriate, given that the theme relates to the psychological coldness of a killer.

But unlike "Suspiria", wherein the story is almost irrelevant, "Deep Red" has an intriguing premise, with a plot that, although slow to get going, is nevertheless coherent, and builds to a riveting finale. I was quite surprised at who the killer was. Clues are very subtle, but they're there, if you know where to look. There's a nifty plot twist toward the film's end. I like the visuals in all of the Argento films I have seen. But "Deep Red", more than others, has a better developed story line. As such, the film is my second favorite Argento giallo. My personal favorite is "The Bird With The Crystal Plumage".

Weak dialogue and weak characterization permeate Argento's films. But his fans don't seem to mind. I certainly don't. What I did find annoying in "Deep Red" was the background music. Most viewers like the sound of Goblin. But to me, the music was too frantic, and not really suitable for a thriller.

There are few contemporary horror films that compare to those of Dario Argento. His giallos are: Gothic, brutal, impressionistic, artistic, and sometimes surreal. "Deep Red" is one of the best.

Reviewed by Libretio 9 / 10

A masterpiece, depending on which version you see

DEEP RED (Profondo Rosso)

Aspect ratio: 2.39:1 (Techniscope)

Sound format: Mono

After witnessing the brutal murder of his psychic neighbor (Macha Meril) by person or persons unknown, a British musician in Rome (David Hemmings) obsesses over details of the crime and uncovers a series of clues which lead to further bloodshed and horror.

Released in Italy at 126 minutes, Dario Argento's seminal psycho-thriller was edited down to 105 minutes for European exhibition and further curtailed to 100 minutes for the American market, where it was dismissed by critics as an incoherent mess. In fact, this was Argento's return to the giallo format following a brief - and unlikely - detour into comedy (FIVE DAYS OF MILAN), and the first time he was allowed to 'cut loose' and indulge his unique sensibilities. All the elements of a classic Argento thriller are here: Eccentric characterizations, outlandish plot twists, and a series of Grand Guignol set-pieces that would revolutionize the genre. Using the wide, w-i-d-e screen to create a bold visual tapestry, Argento's film thrives on offbeat sounds and images: The child's song which pre-empts the shocking murders; the heart-stopping moment when Hemmings glimpses Meril at her apartment window as the killer lunges at her from behind (a shot which is both horrific and profoundly humane, all at the same time); the crazy-surreal mannikin which appears from nowhere and 'confronts' a potential victim; and the climactic revelation of the killer's identity as Hemmings finds damning evidence literally staring him in the face. Hemmings is the heart and soul of the entire picture, an innocent abroad whose inquisitive nature fails to mask his essential cowardice, and there are fine supporting performances by Daria Nicolodi, Gabriele Lavia and Clara Calamai in pivotal roles.

The European print which played outside Italy is a tightly-controlled whirlwind of horror and suspense, incorporating character development and violence cut from the American variant. However, the complete Italian version is another matter altogether: Except for the extra material added to Hemmings' search of 'The House of the Screaming Child' (where an important clue is literally concealed in the brickwork), the additional footage simply pads proceedings to breaking point. Whereas the characters were once defined by their experiences, the longer print includes lengthy dialogue exchanges which ramble well beyond their relevance to the plot. Still a masterpiece, the movie works best at 105 minutes, though the flawed Italian edition is no less sumptuous and invigorating.

Sadly, DEEP RED contains one of the most dubious images in Argento's entire filmography: A shot of a lizard impaled on a needle, done for real. This monstrous act of cruelty is inexcusable, given that Argento had hired ace effects technician Carlo Rambaldi, previously responsible for *simulated* animal carnage in Lucio Fulci's A LIZARD IN A WOMAN'S SKIN (1971) which was so realistic, it landed the director in court!

(English version)

Reviewed by AngryChair 10 / 10

Plenty of red to be seen and style to savor!

Thrilling giallo masterpiece is considered by many to be one of the finest, if not the finest, films made by horror master Dario Argento.

When musician witnesses brutal murder, he joins a quirky journalist in the hunt for a mysterious killer.

It's not hard to see why many believe this film to be Argento's greatest and a landmark in the giallo horror genre. The film is an engrossing murder mystery, possessing many of the elements of Argento's great debut film The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970). Argento throws in lots of his unique trademark style with plenty of inventive set pieces, clever cinematography, and terrific atmosphere and imagery. Deep Red also has some of the most horrific murder sequences of the genre and there's plenty of gruesomeness to be had! Adding all the more to the proceedings is the energetic music score of Goblin.

The cast is also good. David Hemmings makes for a great leading man. Daria Nicolodi, who would later be long-time girlfriend to director Argento, shines as the journalist. Hemmings and Nicolodi have some nicely comical scenes together that add even more color to the film. Also worthy of mention is Gabriele Lavia in his role as Hemmings alcoholic friend and Macha Meril as an ill-fated psychic.

While this Argento fan still favors Suspiria (1977) as Argento's finest film, it's easy to see why Deep Red is considered his greatest by some. It's a terrific landmark thriller that firmly ranks as one of Argento's best!

**** out of ****

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