Clambake

1967

Comedy / Musical

1
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 61%
IMDb Rating 5.5 10 2061

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 23,533 times
June 24, 2018 at 04:58 AM

Cast

Teri Garr as Dancer
Lee Majors as Man in Restaurant
Elvis Presley as Scott Hayward / 'Tom Wilson'
Bill Bixby as James J. Jamison III
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
825.4 MB
1280*544
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 2 / 7
1.57 GB
1920*816
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 5 / 15

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by estabansmythe 6 / 10

I know, I know, but it's still fun

As weird as this sounds, I've always preferred the Elvis movies that aren't considered among his best. His best include "Jailhouse Rock," "Loving You" and "Wild In The Country." You know, the heavier, more serious early ones.

No, I'll take his later films - you got it, the dumb, stupid, oh-so light ones. Films like "Tickle Me," "Girl Happy," "Spinout" and "Double Trouble." And "Clambake." The plots were always mindless fun and "Clambake" is no different.

Elvis was almost always a moody, brooding loner in the early films. He usually played unappreciative guys with chips on his shoulder the size of the Rock of Gibraltar. The characters in those films are guys I'd have little desire to know.

However, the guys he played in his later movies aren't that way at all. They're nice, decent, upstanding, fun-loving fellas. I like those guys. I like watching them as heroes, as leading characters in fun, dumb little movies. Hence, I like those movies a lot more. I couldn't give a rat's rear about appraising them as serious films because they're not.

In his silly mindless mid-'60s films, Elvis always had a goofy main sidekick. Here in "Clambake," it's Will Hutchins, who starred in one of Warner brothers' classic '60s television westerns, "Sugarfoot." And believe me, Hutchins can goof it up with the best of them.

The two wise, sage, old guys are (1) old pro James Gregory and (2) Bette Davis' ex, Gary Merrill, who, if you really look, often looked as though he hated whatever film he was in.

Elvis' Number One girl, Shelly Fabares plays the gal Elvis competes for with Bill "My Favorite Martian" Bixby. There are also plenty of Elvis Girls around, as usual.

Alas, there are no true classics or any memorable songs in the entire film. Tunes like "High Hopes" clone "Confidence" aren't either.

"Clambake" ain't no "Tickle me," but it's still great fun!

Reviewed by aimless-46 7 / 10

One of His Better Films

Although it has the worst title of any Elvis movie, "Clambake" (1967) is actually one of his better films. Which is surprising as it is one of his last and generally speaking each film seemed a bit worse than its predecessor. "Clambake's" salvation is certainly not in the soundtrack which is at best very ordinary, only the title song has any energy. Although there is an actual clambake scene on the beach about midway into the film, it seems thrown in just to justify the title, more impressive is a cameo of "Flipper" who had his own television show at that time.

I'm inclined to credit Shelley Fabares for the good vibe I got from this film. She plays "golddigger with a heart of gold" Dianne Carter, Elvis' ultimate love interest. I never cared for her uptight Mary Stone character on reruns of "The Donna Reed Show", and therefore paid almost no attention to her until recently. But since seeing her in "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Clambake" I've had a major attitude adjustment. "Clambake" was the third time she was tapped for the love interest role in an Elvis film so obviously she and the King had grown comfortable working together.

Their romance is a little different than the Elvis standard. In "Clambake" she does not start out hating or ignoring him. Instead they quickly become friends and she is obviously attracted, but she puts the brakes on any romance because she is hunting for a rich husband and has tycoon J.J. Jamison (Bill Bixby) squarely in her sights. She comes around in the end and their chemistry actually feels real, much like it did with Ann Margret in "Viva Las Vegas".

The comfort factor is also apparent between Elvis and Will Hutchins, his real-life buddy. Oil tycoon Scott (Elvis) pulls a "Prince and the Pauper" and swaps places with drifter Tom Wilson (Hutchins). He wants to find someone who loves him for himself. Hutchins is supposed to provide the film's main comic relief as he enjoys the life of the rich and famous, driving Scott's "Munsters" inspired convertible and surrounding himself with gorgeous women who can't dance very well. Although the director had Hutchins overplay the part it is so poorly written that they can't squeeze many laughs out of the premise. But having most of his scenes with Fabares and Hutchins seems to have relaxed Elvis considerably, which makes both he and his film more likable.

Contrary to most, I enjoyed the corny playground scene with the little girl who was afraid of the slide. The "Confidence" song is not a rip off of "High Hopes", the whole scene is a variation on the "Bounce Right Back" number Donald O'Connor did in "Anything Goes". While "Confidence" is not much of a song, this surreal scene is priceless. I wonder what long-time fans thought as they watched Elvis and Hutchins do something so totally "Guffman"? Most entertainers only do embarrassing stuff like this when they are first breaking into the business.

Then again, what do I know? I'm only a child.

Reviewed by John Macaluso 10 / 10

Not a bad movie at all!

I've read all those negative comments about "Clambake" from the other users here, and I fail to understand what they're all talking about. Maybe it's not rated the best but I think "Clambake" is Cool with a capital C. Elvis portrays an oil heir that's had a belly full of false friends apparently just because he's rich or actually it's his dad Duster Heyward that's the actual tycoon. His son Scott (Elvis) is offered the opportunity to change places with a buddy he meets at a hamburger stand, who notices the attention Scott gets from a girl, once she sees his shiny red convertible. Scott explains to Tom why this is the problem he's having, "I'd like to know it's myself! Not my car, not my money" Tom tells Scott "That's the kind of problem I'd like to have. So anytime you want to switch places just say the word!" Apparently Scott does say the word then Scott becomes "Tom Wilson" and Tom becomes "Scott Heyward. Then it's off to the hotel where "Tom" meets Diane (Shelley Fabares) and asks "Tom" to give her a ski lesson so she could meet the famous boat racer and tycoon James J. Jamison III (Bill Bixby) who "Tom" competes with for Diane Carter. In the end "Tom Wilson" (the King) creates a formula to keep the critical boat sturdy which he races in, wins the race (hopefully), and of course what Elvis does in most every other movie, wins the girl. The plot is great and the cast and crew are all magnificent. On a scale of 1 to 10 I give it a 9.9.

Read more IMDb reviews

1 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment