China Moon

1994

Crime / Mystery / Romance / Thriller

9
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 40%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 38%
IMDb Rating 6.2 10 4978

Synopsis


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January 14, 2018 at 06:44 AM

Director

Cast

Benicio Del Toro as Lamar Dickey
Madeleine Stowe as Rachel Munro
Ed Harris as Kyle Bodine
Charles Dance as Rupert Munro
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
751.59 MB
1280*548
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 1 / 11
1.54 GB
1904*816
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 1 / 12

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by seymourblack-1 8 / 10

A Visually Strong Thriller With A Twist

"China Moon" is a steamy thriller that begins modestly with a number of typical film noir components which lead the audience into believing that they know what's going to follow. The reality, however, is that the plot departs from the conventional "Double Indemnity" template and ultimately leads to a twist which is both original and unexpected. There's a great deal to enjoy in this story of passion, treachery and murder including a superb performance by Ed Harris, some beautiful visual moments and even some great blues music by the excellent Anson Funderburgh and The Rockets.

Kyle Bodine (Ed Harris) is an ace detective who's extremely adept at examining murder scenes, deducing how the crime was committed and then identifying clues about the nature of the perpetrator. He's a decent man who's well respected by his colleagues but he's also lonely and sometimes arrogant. His powers of observation are normally exceptionally strong but he doesn't see what's coming when he meets and then gets seduced by the beautiful and mysterious Rachel Munro (Madeleine Stowe).

Rachel is married to a rich banker called Rupert (Charles Dance) who's a serial adulterer and wife beater. During a particularly heated confrontation with her husband, Rachel shoots and kills him in self defence and then persuades Kyle to assist her in disposing of the body and covering up the evidence of what has happened. Kyle carries out these tasks with his usual efficiency but problems arise when the body is discovered and his rookie partner Lamar Dickey (Benicio del Toro) discovers some clues which lead to the finger of suspicion being pointed at Kyle.

Ed Harris looks perfectly comfortable in his portrayal of Kyle's unassuming demeanour and is totally believable as he becomes passionate about Rachel and then increasingly desperate as he tries to prove his innocence. Madeleine Stowe shows the despondency which has overtaken Rachel as a consequence of suffering years of abuse in a loveless marriage but at other times it seems that her depression has made her unresponsive and difficult to read. This type of inscrutability is a classic trait of the femme fatale but Rachel doesn't fall unequivocally into that category as she is clearly a more sympathetic character than the conventional noir archetype.

Charles Dance is good at conveying just how violent and despicable Rupert is but his attempt at a southern accent is lamentable. Benicio del Toro gives an interesting performance as a detective who initially shows a number of significant deficiencies in his range of abilities but then later in the story surprisingly seems to acquire a much better grasp of the skills needed to investigate a homicide.

The visual style of this movie with its beautiful settings and wonderful shots of the lake at night contributes strongly to the overall mood and is a great credit to the work of cinematographer Willy Kurant.

Reviewed by Dusan Petrovic 3 / 10

Eye for an Eye

I just love Madeleine Stowe ( Cora in Last of the Mohicans ). In this movie she is the Irish blind violin player from NY, who has been suddenly attacked by serial killer. Ed Harris is smooth Cop, trying to protect her and bring to justice the violator. But, the problem is that she's blind. in the end the justice is served. I don't believe in law, but the order. Twisted killers don't deserve to be in jails. All they deserve is six feet under. I was really happy when i've watched this movie until it's very end. Love between man and the woman is stronger than life as itself.

Reviewed by Spikeopath 7 / 10

The porcelain prince and princess.

China Moon is directed by John Bailey and written by Roy Carlson. It stars Ed Harris, Madeleine Stowe, Benicio del Toro, Charles Dance and Patricia Healy. Music is by George Fenton and cinematography by Willy Kurant.

To be kind since China Moon is a very good film in its own right, that is for lovers of film noir and its off shoot neo-noir, it's a film where its only crime is not being as great as previous instalments of noirs classic era and neo. Story treads deliciously familiar ground, where Harris' intrepid cop falls deep for Stowe's sultry babe and before he can say " I would do anything for you", he's in it up to his neck.

In true noir fashion there's a twisty road to be navigated, nothing is as it at first seems, with hidden agendas, shifty shenanigans and emotional turmoil all playing a hand. The police procedural aspect intrigues greatly, with the devilish kicker of Harris investigating himself, while the intricacies of crime investigation - such as bullet science - is not given short shrift.

As a mood piece it scores high, the sweaty Florida settings ripe for Bailey (a cinematographer by trade) to mix a bit of poetic ambiance with misty shimmers, rainy bleakness and colour coded criminality that's not detrimental to true noir essence. Perfs are from the higher end of the scale, and the makers add enough original touches of their own so as to not let this become a pointless retread.

Closing superbly with a double whammy finale, China Moon is one that film noir lovers should sample. 7/10

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