Blood Bath

1966

Action / Horror

2
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 36%
IMDb Rating 5 10 518

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Sid Haig as Abdul the Arab
Roger Corman as Antonio Sordi
William Campbell as Antonio Sordi
Patrick Magee as Linda's Husband
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
445.46 MB
1204*720
English
23.976 fps
1hr 2 min
P/S 3 / 1
955.23 MB
1792*1072
English
23.976 fps
1hr 2 min
P/S 3 / 1

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by BA_Harrison 4 / 10

A confusing horror curio.

This film has quite the convoluted history, which accounts for it being such a disjointed mess. Starting life as a Yugoslavian/USA co-production titled Operation Titian, partly funded by the legendary producer Roger Corman, the movie was edited down, re-titled Portrait in Terror and sold for US TV. Not finished with the film, Corman then hired legendary exploitation director Jack Hill to shoot new scenes and released the result as Blood Bath. Finally, director Stephanie Rothman was brought in to film even more scenes, the final incarnation of the movie being called Track of the Vampire. This is the cut that I saw, and its a completely baffling experience.

William Campbell plays artist Toni Sordi, whose paintings depict women in the throes of death. In reality, Sordi is an ancient vampire who kills his models, dropping them into a vat of bubbling molten wax. After claiming the lives of several pretty young women (and a jealous husband, played by Patrick Magee), Sordi is pursued by a gang of beatniks (including Jack Hill regular Sid Haig), but ultimately falls prey to his wax encased victims, who come back to life and give him a taste of his own medicine (in a scene reminiscent of gory 1980 shocker Maniac, starring Joe Spinell).

Featuring an amusing satire of the '60s art scene (dig that crazy quantum painting!), a lengthy interpretive dance routine on a deserted beach courtesy of ballerina Dorean (the lovely Lori Saunders, who also sports a range of skimpy bikinis throughout the film), a murder on a merry-go-round, another in a swimming pool, and lots of running around an old medieval town (which we are supposed to believe is in California, NOT Serbia), the film is definitely something of a curio but not much of a horror film.

3.5 out of 10, rounded up to 4 for the groovy prismatic effect during the beach dance.

Reviewed by hwg1957-102-265704 6 / 10

"You came back to me as I knew you would"

Put together from different sources of footage this actually hangs together quite well. An artist haunted by a woman one of his ancestors killed continues to murder young women and paint pictures of their corpses. It's only sixty two minutes long so it tells its story without any fuss and some of it looks excellent. Dark shadows, dark empty streets and gloomy beach scenes. There is a bleak atmosphere most of the time that is quite effective and some of it is quite creepy. The last scenes are very well done.

What does let it down is the acting. William Campbell as Antonio Sordi tries to do a tortured artist but is stiff and unconvincing. The rest of the cast are not much better though I did find the group of beatniks in the cafe talking about 'quantum' art amusing. Lori Saunders runs around in several bikinis distractingly.

It is worth seeing for the cinematography and some good macabre touches.

Reviewed by Leofwine_draca 2 / 10

Four films for the price of one?

This is one of those movies that's been made up of about four totally different productions. Blame Roger Corman. The initial movie, directed by exploitation king Jack Hill, involves a possessed painter whose "red dead nudes" have become critical masterpieces; of course, it transpires that he's under the influence of an evil spirit, and that he murders the women who pose as his subjects. This part of the movie is a bit like the gore flick COLOR ME BLOOD RED and would have benefited from being shot in colour so we could see all the red stuff. It's rather stodgy and dull, lacking in inspiration, aside from the genuinely chilling climax that sees the mutilated, wax-entombed victims of the tagline returning to stage their grubby revenge on the painter.

Apparently, ANOTHER film – the unfinished Operation Titian – was being shot in Yugoslavia at the same time and Francis Ford Coppola participated in its production. Anyway, Corman didn't like the result so he hired a director, Stephanie Rothman, to shoot new scenes in which the painter becomes a vampire and chases nubile women around cities and beaches. To add to the confusion, some of the original cast members return, making it harder to spot where the different scenes have been spliced together. Finally, as if this wasn't enough, Corman needed a longer film to show on television, so he added another eleven minutes of random stuff – outtakes, a woman dancing on a beach for what seems like twenty minutes or so, etc. The resulting concoction is a confused mess that will try the patience of even the most hardened B-movie fanatic.

This is nothing like DEMENTIA 13, the decent Corman/Coppola movie from a few years before. It's a mess, with many boring and pointless sequences, and even the action bits, the various chases, go on too long and are devoid of interest. This is a vampire who doesn't think twice about jumping in a swimming pool to catch a victim or chasing another into the ocean! A few cast members are familiar. William Campbell, the villain, returns from DEMENTIA 13. I thought I saw Patrick Magee pop up playing the vampire, although he's not credited. One of my favourite actors, Sid Haig, does appear in some of the film's best scenes – comedy filler moments involving a gang of Beatniks trying out a new method of 'quantum' art. These scenes seem to have been left over from A BUCKET OF BLOOD and it's a delight to see Haig on screen, even if only for a few moments. Popular US actress Lori Saunders is the nominal heroine and spends most of the film prancing around in a little bikini. Even half-naked women in the cast and Sid Haig (with HAIR!) can't save this mess of a production.

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