Beach Rats

2017

Drama

21
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 82%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 60%
IMDb Rating 6.4 10 6712

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 126,856 times
November 09, 2017 at 07:17 PM

Director

Cast

Neal Huff as Joe
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
726.68 MB
1280*714
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 38 min
P/S 4 / 32
1.5 GB
1920*1072
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 38 min
P/S 8 / 27

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by evanston_dad 9 / 10

Sensitive and Haunting

I went to IMDb to see what other people had said about this film, and the very first review I saw had the title of "Boring."

"Beach Rats" is quiet and thoughtful, and it demands a certain amount of patience, but it breaks my heart that someone would dismiss it as boring. It follows a lost youth navigating the no man's land between teenager and adult as he tries to figure out how to be the person he wants to be -- whoever that is -- in an environment that tells him who he should be. He hangs out with a bunch of losers who speak in a kind of dumb bro language and couldn't string together an articulate thought between the three of them while wandering aimlessly around Coney Island and its environs looking to score easy drugs. Meanwhile, he carries on a secret life of gay encounters with older men while at the same time trying to force himself to enjoy a relationship with a young woman who's too mature for him.

Is he gay? Probably. Does he specifically seek out older men as father figures because his own dad just recently died of lingering cancer? Maybe. But the point is that he doesn't have the tools required to process any of the things he's feeling because he lives in a stunted place surrounded by stunted people, and it's easier to escape into feeling good the bad way than to put work into feeling better the hard way.

More than anything "Beach Rats" is about how hard it is for men to explore their own feelings in a culture that has rigidly defined what it means to be masculine.

Grade: A

Reviewed by Bayamon_Hill 5 / 10

A film that exploits the sadness of the closet

It is a little shocking to see this movie in 2017. The desperate situation that the writer/director creates for her character as entertainment is so dark and frankly, cruel, that it offends me as someone who lived/lives with that desperation. Frankie is a typical street kid from Brooklyn in many ways. He and his crew don't have much to do, so they go to Coney Island and take prescription drugs to create mild entertainment. He's atypical in that he's capable of being pleasant and respectful, when necessary. He's also gay in a world designed for straight bros, and he lives out that part of his life on a hook-up chat website. This set-up is straight from a gay 1990's movie, when the AIDS epidemic was winding down and being gay was scary - queer films reflected that back then. Like those tragic movies of yesteryear, Frankie becomes more and more isolated by his choices and actions. He finds himself alienated from his friends, his family, his straight girlfriend, his potential boyfriends and himself. And then the movie ends. The writer/director is a straight woman whose artistic decisions amount to having a character put in a glass box that is slowly filling with water just to see what happens. It's cruel. I think the problem is that as gayness is more socially acceptable as a topic for film, straight people feel empowered to tell those stories but their conception of gayness is from the 1990's. "Brokeback Mountain", "Moonlight" and "Beach Rats" are all straight people's assessments of gay life, and man are they bleak.

Reviewed by Varun Bhargava 6 / 10

Reality even in 2018.

The movie quite accurately depicts what closeted boys do and go through.. Acceptability in society is kept above self and for good. Fear of rejection by friends is quite what the character depicts and chooses not to accept himself as he is. Even when in company of a gay man, fears what might happen if he accepts the truth.

The ending however is a bit abrupt. Great concept but not so good execution..

Read more IMDb reviews

11 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment